Latest updates

Supreme Court sidesteps important TCPA deference issues
Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • 19 July 2019

In a long-awaited decision, the Supreme Court was expected to provide greater clarity on the extent to which litigants can challenge the Federal Communications Commission's Telephone Consumer Protection Act interpretations in private litigation. However, instead of deciding that issue, the court vacated the Fourth Circuit's ruling and remanded the case for further development.

Cyberspace Administration of China issues rules on protection of children's personal information
AnJie Law Firm
  • China
  • 19 July 2019

The Cyberspace Administration of China recently held a public consultation on the Provisions on the Cyber Protection of Personal Information of Children (Draft for Comment). The draft provisions set out a number of recommendations for network operators, including formulating special rules to protect children's personal information and user agreements and employing a personal information protection specialist or designating personnel to oversee the protection of children's personal information.

Review of private WhatsApp messages on work mobile phone deemed unlawful
Walder Wyss
  • Switzerland
  • 19 July 2019

The Supreme Court of the Canton of Zurich recently clarified that employers must clearly regulate the private use of work communication devices, as well as any related control mechanisms. Further, data processing such as verifying WhatsApp chat messages – even if the information is stored on a work mobile phone – must be done in accordance with the more restrictive Article 328b of the Code of Obligations.

Federal Anti-monopoly Service clarifies role of online messenger systems in advertising
Gorodissky & Partners
  • Russia
  • 12 July 2019

Advertisers are increasingly using online messenger systems to promote businesses, as well as their goods and services. In this context, the Federal Anti-monopoly Service recently issued an official letter clarifying, among other things, the application of the Federal Law on Advertising to messenger systems such as Viber and WhatsApp. The letter is notable as it reveals the regulator's approach to advertising campaigns disseminated via various instant messaging services.

Cyberspace administration releases new rules on security assessment of cross-border transfers of personal information
AnJie Law Firm
  • China
  • 12 July 2019

The Cyberspace Administration of China recently released the Measures on Security Assessment of Cross-Border Transfer of Personal Information (Draft for Comment). According to the draft, network operators must apply to the provincial-level cyberspace administration for a security assessment before conducting cross-border transfers. Further, network operators must record all cross-border transfers and retain the records for at least five years.

Nevada's new privacy law with data sale opt-out right will take effect before CCPA
Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • 21 June 2019

Senate Bill 220 was recently signed into law, making Nevada the first state to join California in granting consumers the right to opt out of the sale of their personal information. However, the new privacy law is significantly narrower than the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). For example, it applies only to online activities, defines 'consumer' and 'sale' more narrowly and includes broad exceptions for financial institutions subject to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act.

Update on FCC 5.9GHz band rulemaking proceeding
Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • 14 June 2019

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Ajit Pai recently announced plans to open a rulemaking proceeding to take a fresh look at the 5.9GHz band. In this new proceeding, the FCC will consider whether and how to allow sharing in the 5.9GHz band between dedicated short-range communication, gigabit Wi-Fi and cellular vehicle-to-everything technologies.

Huawei ban – will smartphones lose their smarts?
Shay & Partners
  • Taiwan
  • 14 June 2019

US President Donald Trump's recent executive order which blacklists Huawei has generated a significant response from Huawei smartphone users, mobile operators and distributors in Taiwan which are handling returned purchases. One of the principal complaints from consumers is that once a Huawei smartphone is deprived of its Android operating system and Google services, it is no longer as 'smart' as it should be.

Implementation plan adopted for national cybersecurity strategy
Walder Wyss
  • Switzerland
  • 14 June 2019

The Federal Council recently adopted a plan to implement the national strategy to protect Switzerland against cyber risks until 2022 and took additional steps towards the establishment of a cybersecurity competence centre. Work is also underway to develop a cyber-defence campus and strengthen capabilities relating to information acquisition and allocation.

Internet for everyone?
Hogan Lovells BSTL SC
  • Mexico
  • 07 June 2019

The Federal Electricity Commission recently published draft terms of reference for a new tender procedure in which 50,000km of two strands of dark fibre will be allocated for the provision of free internet services to all citizens under the so-called 'Internet for All' project. Specialist opinions on the project's feasibility have been mixed, and the president has stated that if no winner is published in the near future, he will create a government agency to provide internet services throughout the country.

New measures to regulate OTT service providers
Shay & Partners
  • Taiwan
  • 07 June 2019

Despite the fact that Taiwan's broadband market is flooded with over-the-top (OTT) media services, the National Communications Commission has yet to regulate OTT service providers. However, the government recently issued a presidential order to amend the Copyright Act and outlaw malicious online infringement. Since the order's enactment, local cable and satellite channel operators (among others) have identified at least 42 OTT boxes and apps which may be considered illegal under the revised act.

CCPA amendments advance through California Assembly
Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • 31 May 2019

Several legislative proposals seeking to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act are moving forward following a recent hearing before the California Assembly's Committee on Privacy and Consumer Protection in which the bills were approved. The bills will advance to the assembly's Appropriations Committee before being voted on by the full assembly and potentially advancing to the California State Senate for consideration.

Police authorities issue guidelines on protection of personal information
AnJie Law Firm
  • China
  • 31 May 2019

The Security Protection Bureau of the Ministry of Public Security, the Beijing Cyber Industry Association and Research Institute Number 3 of the Ministry of Public Security recently issued the Guidelines for the Protection of Personal Information Security on the Internet, which set out a series of measures and processes for the protection of personal information. Although the guidelines appear to be non-binding, they are likely to be treated as a statute-like norm.

Beyond FERPA: CCPA's new rules for privacy in education sector
Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • 24 May 2019

In 2018 California passed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which seeks to give consumers additional safeguards regarding their personal information. The CCPA will become effective in January 2020 and may impact companies in the education sector, including large education technology companies. Regulated educational entities should be wary of the CCPA's key requirements, including the deletion of consumers' personal information on request.

MIIT cracks down on intrusive telemarketing and misuse of personal information
AnJie Law Firm
  • China
  • 24 May 2019

Following the Chinese Central TV Station's (CCTV's) broadcast of the 3.15 programme in 2019, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology decided to crack down on telephone harassment and strengthen the protection of personal information in the telecoms and internet sectors. The CCTV will broadcast 3.15 on 15 March each year in order to reveal company activities which infringe consumer rights and interests.

AI and online harms: what does government's white paper mean for industry?
Bird & Bird LLP London
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 May 2019

The government recently released the much-anticipated Online Harms White Paper. Jointly authored by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport and the Home Office, the paper sets out the government's proposals to address harms ranging from terrorism and child sexual exploitation to disinformation and harassment. It proposes fundamental changes to internet regulation in the United Kingdom and suggests that, among other technologies, AI may be both a source of the challenges and a means to resolve them.

One IoTa of consensus: bipartisan legislation to improve cybersecurity for internet-connected devices
Hogan Lovells
  • USA
  • 17 May 2019

Congress recently introduced a bipartisan proposal to enhance cybersecurity for the network of internet-connected devices, commonly known as the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT Cybersecurity Improvement Act 2019 aims to establish baseline cybersecurity standards for IoT devices. It would also impose limits on the types of IoT device that the US government can purchase.

SCC continues to assess unlawful collection of personal information by apps
AnJie Law Firm
  • China
  • 17 May 2019

The Shanghai Consumer Council recently released the results of its assessment of 39 apps, which aimed to evaluate the level of access that they had to users' personal information. The assessment revealed that 25 apps had been over collecting users' personal information and that only 14 apps had actual service-related reasons justifying their collection of sensitive personal information.

New law introduced to regulate digital rights
Gorodissky & Partners
  • Russia
  • 17 May 2019

The president recently signed the Digital Rights Law, which will take effect on 1 October 2019. The law has introduced a number of new legal concepts into Russian legislation, including digital rights, e-transactions, smart contracts and Big Data. Companies doing business on the digital level in Russia should familiarise themselves with the background and key provisions of the law to ensure that they are ready to operate in the new legislative environment.

New proposal to fine parties which install surveillance in private locations
AnJie Law Firm
  • China
  • 10 May 2019

The Shenzhen Municipality Justice Bureau recently issued draft regulations on the administration of public security video and image systems for public comment. The draft regulations aim to protect public privacy and strengthen internet information security and information sharing by prohibiting the installation of video and image recording systems in certain locations which concern public privacy. Individuals and entities which fail to comply with the regulations will be subject to fines.

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