Latest updates

Appellate court rules that subrogated insurers assume same rights and limitations as assureds
Kincaid | Mendes Vianna Advogados
  • Brazil
  • 17 July 2019

A recent Sao Paulo State Appellate Court case concerned a carriage of goods by sea from Port Everglades (United States) to the port of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). The court's decision sets an important precedent in recognising that subrogation cannot be used to reinstate a right that no longer applies where a rights holder fails to observe a legal requirement. Therefore, subrogated insurers assume the same rights and limitations as assureds.

The bunker balance – owners consider liquefied natural gas in advance of 2020
Wikborg Rein
  • International
  • 17 July 2019

Using liquefied natural gas (LNG) rather than fuel oil is one of a range of options available to owners seeking to comply with the International Maritime Organisation's 2020 regulations. Given that shipbrokers have long predicted the emergence of a two-tier shipping market with 'greener' ships commanding a premium over older, less eco-friendly vessels, what is the future for LNG bunkering and what challenges does it present?

Readiness for global sulphur cap – BIMCO's new IMO 2020 clauses
Wikborg Rein
  • International
  • 10 July 2019

Most parties involved in the shipping industry will by now have a clear picture of the requirements under the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) 2020 global sulphur cap on marine fuels. Therefore, attention has turned to the steps that must be taken to put these requirements into practice. Two clauses recently introduced by the Baltic and International Maritime Council aim to address certain contractual aspects of the IMO requirements as they apply to time charterparties.

Carrier liability for loss of goods and delayed delivery
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 10 July 2019

The distinction between freight and forwarding contracts is a common subject of legal disputes in Germany, as freight forwarders are generally liable only for organisational or selection faults and can usually relieve themselves of liability if they can prove that they chose a conscientious carrier. A recent Verden Regional Court ruling on the liability of a carrier for loss of goods and delayed delivery provides useful clarity in this context.

Supreme Court precludes punitive damages for unseaworthiness claims
Wilson Elser
  • USA
  • 03 July 2019

In a landmark decision, the Supreme Court has precluded the recovery of punitive damages for unseaworthiness claims. This decision conclusively resolves a long-running split between federal appellate courts and settles a source of uncertainty in the US maritime industry. With this question resolved, vessel owners and maritime employers are better positioned to assess their exposure for personal injuries and can now arrange the necessary insurance coverages to manage the risks.

Back to formalities: recap fixture held insufficient evidence of charter contract
Dardani Studio Legale
  • Italy
  • 03 July 2019

The Tribunal of Milan recently published a judgment analysing a common occurrence in shipping matters where a contract of charter is not incorporated into an agreement duly executed by both parties, but is instead contained in a recap fixture exchanged via email. The decision is noteworthy as it reaches conclusions (significantly different from prevailing Italian case law) which deserve to be carefully considered when concluding charter parties.

Manager's letter of undertaking – moving towards more balanced standards?
Wikborg Rein
  • International
  • 03 July 2019

Third-party ship managers are often required to issue letters of undertaking to financiers of a managed vessel on relatively unfavourable and financier-friendly terms. The Baltic and International Maritime Council's new standard ship manager's letter of undertaking, which was recently published, seeks to redress the balance and gives ship managers a more equitable set of terms, which may be used as a starting point for negotiations.

Pleasure yacht insurance: navigating without up-to-date charts and proper voyage plan
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 03 July 2019

In a notable hull insurance case, the Celle Court of Appeal dismissed an action brought by an assured pleasure yacht owner who had been sailing on the Baltic Sea and ran aground. The case facts suggest that assureds are often unaware of the impact that outdated chart materials can have on hull insurance and liability cover.

Ship arrests: revisiting 'genuine and reasonable' need for security
Bowmans
  • South Africa
  • 26 June 2019

The Supreme Court of Appeal recently took a hard line regarding an arresting party and delivered a salutary message to pay close attention to establishing a plausible link between the factors justifying a 'genuine and reasonable' need for security and the particular facts and circumstances of the party against which an arrest order is sought. The judgment is a cautionary tale for arresting parties that seek to rely on generalised allegations.

Quiet enjoyment letters – benefit to lenders?
Wikborg Rein
  • International
  • 19 June 2019

Quiet enjoyment letters are often used where a ship, rig or other unit being financed is subject to a long-term charterparty to govern the interrelationship between the owner, its financiers and the charterer. They provide the charterer with a right to the undisturbed use and enjoyment of the ship, independent of whether the owner in its capacity as borrower is in default of its obligations towards its lender under the loan agreement. But do quiet enjoyment letters have any benefit for lenders?

Who is the official Receiver of Wrecks?
Akabogu & Associates
  • Nigeria
  • 19 June 2019

Wrecks pose a real danger to navigational safety and the marine environment and their expeditious removal, control and management is therefore a key concern. The issue of wreck control in Nigeria has been the subject of an increasingly fierce conflict between the Nigerian Inland Waterways Authority, the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency and the Nigerian Ports Authority.

FDFA opens consultation procedure on CLNI 2012
ThomannFischer
  • Switzerland
  • 19 June 2019

The Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) recently opened a consultation procedure on the Strasbourg Convention on the Limitation of Liability in Inland Navigation 2012 and its implementation (ie, an amendment to the Swiss Maritime Navigation Act). The FDFA's proposal has been welcomed and is considered a necessary step towards Switzerland ensuring a level playing field for the inland navigation industry.

Norway prepares for ratification of Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention
Wikborg Rein
  • Norway
  • 19 June 2019

Parliament recently decided that Norway will ratify the Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention and that the convention will be given effect not only in Norway's exclusive economic zone, but also in its territorial waters. Parliament also adopted legislation to implement the convention into Norwegian law once ratified. The legislation will introduce a dual system where the national rules on wreck removal will continue to be in effect and the convention rules will be introduced as a parallel set of rules.

Irrevocable power of attorney as additional security
Fenech & Fenech Advocates
  • Malta
  • 19 June 2019

If an event of default occurs, a power of attorney executed by the mortgagor will allow the mortgagee to apply for the immediate closure of the vessel's Maltese register on the mortgagor's behalf and to pay all fees, make all declarations and receive all certificates, including the deletion certificate. While not essential for enforcement, registration of the irrevocable power of attorney is nevertheless an option for mortgagees and provides the added benefit of allowing for swifter enforcement in cases of default.

New law allows passenger cabotage on foreign cruise vessels
JJR Abogados
  • Chile
  • 12 June 2019

The Merchant Navy Law, which includes a cabotage reservation system, implies that only Chilean vessels are permitted to provide maritime or fluvial transport services (of cargo or passengers) within Chile or its exclusive economic zone. However, Law 21,138 recently came into force, allowing passenger cabotage on foreign cruise vessels provided that certain conditions are met.

Worldwide freezing orders upheld in multinational shipping fraud case
Wikborg Rein
  • United Kingdom
  • 12 June 2019

The High Court recently upheld two worldwide freezing orders in a multinational shipping fraud case were upheld, rejecting the defendant's allegations of breaches of full and frank disclosure. Among other things, the judgment is a useful confirmation and strengthening of the standing of intermediary charterers to sue for the full value of the hire in circumstances where the claimant's ultimate loss may be substantially lower.

New policy on registering vessels in Cyprus Register of Ships
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 12 June 2019

The Deputy Ministry of Shipping recently updated its policy on the eligibility of ships to be registered under the Cyprus flag. The policy stipulates additional requirements beyond those set out in the Merchant Shipping Registration of Ships, Sales and Mortgages Law and should therefore be read in conjunction with the relevant legal provisions.

Special tariff regime proposed for vessel acquisition
Akabogu & Associates
  • Nigeria
  • 05 June 2019

A tripartite arrangement between the Federal Ministry of Finance, the Customs Service and the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) seeks to encourage the expansion of Nigeria's indigenous fleet by creating a special tariff regime for vessel acquisition in the country. According to NIMASA Director General Dakuku Peterside, the high cost of vessel acquisition is gradually driving away many indigenous players in the maritime sector.

New terms and conditions for logistics providers
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 05 June 2019

The Logistics Terms and Conditions (Logistik-AGB) 2019, which were jointly revised by the German Association for Freight Forwarding and Logistics, the Federal Association of Road Haulage, Logistics and Disposal and the Federal Association of Furniture Forwarders and Logistics, will enter into force on 1 July 2019. The new terms and conditions will replace the Logistik-AGB 2006 and supplement the Freight Forwarders' Standard Terms and Conditions 2017.

Sign on the dotted line – importance of signing transport documents
WSCO Advokatpartnerselskab
  • Denmark
  • 29 May 2019

A recent Maritime and Commercial Court decision in which a carrier was found liable for a missing delivery underlines the importance of getting transport documents signed as a receipt for goods delivered. A signed transport document is the carrier's proof of delivery. Hence, in case of doubt as to whether delivery has taken place, the transport document serves as compelling evidence.

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