Latest updates

Lightning damage to aircraft on incoming flights – Aviation Services Law special circumstances
Levitan, Sharon & Co
  • Israel
  • 13 November 2019

In most cases, flights are operated by aircraft that arrive at an airport from a previous flight. As such, flights are sometimes delayed or cancelled due to a delay or cancellation of the previous flight. The Tel Aviv District Court recently denied a motion for leave to appeal filed by a passenger whose claim regarding the cancellation of his flight due to lightning damage to the aircraft which had occurred during the previous flight was denied by the Tel Aviv Small Claims Court.

DOT proposes revisions to airline tarmac delay regulations
Cozen O'Connor
  • USA
  • 13 November 2019

The US Department of Transportation (DOT) has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend its regulations governing situations in which an aircraft remains on the airport tarmac without an opportunity for passengers to deplane for an extended period. Specifically, it proposes to change the departure delay exemption, carrier reporting requirements and record retention requirements, among others. Comments on the notice of proposed rulemaking must be filed with the DOT by 24 December 2019.

Now everyone can fly… with even fewer headaches! Amendments to MAVCOM Protection Code
SKRINE
  • Malaysia
  • 06 November 2019

The Malaysian Aviation Commission Protection Code 2016 was recently amended. The amendments, which considered feedback from consumers and consultations with industry players, aim to promote greater transparency and fairness in dealings between airlines and passengers, which should allow consumers to enjoy monetary savings and make more informed decisions.

Why the Maldives should ratify the Cape Town Convention and Aircraft Equipment Protocol
Mazlan & Murad Law Associates
  • Maldives
  • 06 November 2019

If the Maldives ratifies the Cape Town Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment and the Aircraft Equipment Protocol 2001, it is likely to have a direct and positive effect on airlines, passengers and the Maldives economy as a whole. For example, if borrowing costs reduce, this would pave the way for the acquisition of new modern aircraft with less fuel consumption – ultimately enabling airlines to pass on the benefits to passengers in the form of reduced travel costs.

FAA plans to increase rest periods for US airline flight attendants
Cozen O'Connor
  • USA
  • 06 November 2019

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has begun the process of amending its regulations to require that flight attendants at US airlines receive a rest period of at least 10 consecutive hours between periods of duty lasting 14 hours or less. Under the FAA's current regulations, a flight attendant who is scheduled for a duty period of 14 hours or less must be given a scheduled rest period of at least nine consecutive hours. Comments on the advance notice are due by 12 November 2019.

MAVCOM imposes fines on airline and airport operators
SKRINE
  • Malaysia
  • 30 October 2019

The Malaysian Aviation Commission recently imposed RM200,000 fines on two airline operators for charging credit card, debit card and online banking processing fees separately from their base fares in breach of the Aviation Consumer Protection Code. The commission also issued a RM1.179 million fine to airport operator Malaysian Airports (Sepang) Sdn Bhd for failing to meet several service level requirements regarding airport users under the Implementation of the Airports Quality of Service Framework Directive.

Q&A on pitfalls and red flags when dealing with German MROs
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 23 October 2019

As airlines must constantly strive to reduce maintenance costs, it is prudent to carefully review and negotiate contracts with maintenance, repair and overhaul organisations (MROs). As MROs often insist that contracts must be governed by the law of their home jurisdiction, this article addresses a selection of important issues that must be considered when negotiating so-called 'time and material' or 'power by the hour' contracts with German MROs.

Discounted tariffs: change of legal position?
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 16 October 2019

A recent Frankfurt am Main Local Court decision is a useful reminder that in the event of an assertion of claims under the EU Flight Delay Compensation Regulation, the associated booking conditions must be considered when determining claim validity. Ultimately, travellers with access to corporate customer tariffs between their employer and the airline cannot claim compensation if their flight – whether for professional or private purposes – is delayed or cancelled.

Gateway to The Bahamas: runway rehabilitation project
Callenders & Co
  • Bahamas
  • 16 October 2019

In recent years, there has been significant growth in air traffic to and from The Bahamas. As a result, the government has taken proactive steps to support this growth – notably, with upgrades to several of the country's busiest airports. For example, the Nassau Airport Development Company recently commenced a major rehabilitation project at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This project will, among other things, include an asphalt upgrade to increase the runway's lifespan.

TSA adopts alternative approach to enforcement against airlines and other regulated entities
Cozen O'Connor
  • USA
  • 09 October 2019

The Transportation Security Administration's (TSA's) new Action Plan Programme (APP), which recently went into effect, details an alternative framework for addressing security compliance issues. Rather than relying on traditional, penalty-focused civil enforcement action, the APP focuses on achieving a universally desired outcome – namely, increased aviation security. While the APP could prove beneficial to both the TSA and industry, it raises some areas of concern for airlines and other regulated parties.

Ryanair and Codacons agree ADR mechanism for flight compensation claims
Studio Pierallini
  • Italy
  • 02 October 2019

Due to the continued increase in the number of commercial flights and the resulting growth of passenger compensation claims under the EU Flight Delay Compensation Regulation, Ryanair and Codacons (the largest Italian consumer association) recently signed a valuable partnership agreement which will see them cooperate to settle claims made under the regulation by Italian passengers through alternative dispute resolution.

Court rejects damages claim for rescheduled flight
Freidenberg Freidenberg & Lifsic
  • Argentina
  • 25 September 2019

In a recent Federal Civil and Commercial Court 2 case, the plaintiffs filed a complaint for damages for a rescheduled flight after a mandatory mediation hearing ended without a settlement. However, the court found that the change of flight schedule had complied with civil aviation and consumer rules. As a result, it rejected the claim and imposed legal costs on the losing party.

Airlines challenge fines by immigration office
Freidenberg Freidenberg & Lifsic
  • Argentina
  • 18 September 2019

It is not unusual for immigration authorities to pursue airlines for infringements of the passenger documentation requirements which travellers must meet in order to enter a country. Argentina is no exception and the Immigration Authority (DNM) has been incentivised to detect passenger documentation infringements and collect fines from air carriers. However, a number of recent decisions regarding the DNM's imposition of fines in such cases could mark a turning point with regard to this issue.

Air fares can be displayed in multiple currencies
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 18 September 2019

The Federal Court of Justice recently requested a preliminary ruling from the European Court of Justice on the question of whether airlines are in principle entitled to choose the currencies in which their air fares are listed. Under EU law, airlines that offer flights departing from EU airports must list passenger fares; however, whether airlines have the right to choose the currencies of said listings required further clarity.

Court rules EU Flight Delay Compensation Regulation claim cannot be enforced as breach of contract
Bersenas Jacobsen Chouest Thomson Blackburn LLP
  • Canada
  • 11 September 2019

A recent decision from the Ontario Small Claims Court marks the first time that a Canadian court has considered whether EU air passenger rights legislation can be enforced outside Europe. This decision will be of interest to carriers operating flights between Canada and Europe, as it holds that a tariff that does not expressly incorporate the EU Flight Delay Compensation Regulation will not expose a carrier to breach of contract claims brought in Canada for declining to pay compensation under the regulation.

Compensation must be offset against compensation for damages according to national law
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Germany
  • 04 September 2019

The Federal Court of Justice recently issued a verdict stating that compensation under the EU Flight Delay Compensation Regulation must be offset against compensation claims made under national law that were caused by the same incident. The court's judgment is welcomed, as it prevents passengers from being overcompensated and provides greater legal certainty while balancing the interests of airlines and customers.

Court of Appeal decision on economic duress in aviation market
Vedder Price LLP
  • United Kingdom
  • 28 August 2019

A recent Court of Appeal decision regarding a claim of economic duress against an airline reinforced the fundamental importance of ensuring contractual clarity and certainty as a matter of English law. For companies operating in the aviation sector, where there may be an unequal power dynamic, parties will be unable to look to economic duress to undo a lop-sided bargain unless there is some unlawful action or provable bad faith on the part of the party with greater power.

New drone regulations to come into force in 2020
Shay & Partners
  • Taiwan
  • 28 August 2019

Further to the Unmanned Vehicles Technology Innovation Experimentation Act, which entered into force on 1 June 2019, a new regulation for drone use under the latest amendment to the Civil Aviation Act will take effect on 31 March 2020. Among other requirements, under the new act, drone operators in Taiwan will need to register with and pass an exam conducted by the Civil Aeronautics Administration to obtain an operator licence.

Aircraft repossession in bankruptcy – Brazilian judiciary's inconsistent treatment of lessors
Basch & Rameh
  • Brazil
  • 28 August 2019

A number of recent aircraft repossession actions have demonstrated that a majority of judges have correctly recognised lessor rights to repossession in the face of apparent lease agreement defaults. However, these decisions have not clearly cited the Cape Town Convention as their basis. The Brazilian judiciary's failure to unify repossession actions against a bankrupt lessee in a single court has meant that some lessors are subject to minority view decisions that can be upheld on appeal.

OFAC issues Iran-Related Civil Aviation Industry Advisory
Cozen O'Connor
  • USA
  • 14 August 2019

The US Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) recently issued its Iran-Related Civil Aviation Industry Advisory. The advisory seeks to inform the civil aviation industry of potential exposure to US enforcement actions and economic sanctions for engaging in or supporting unauthorised exports to Iran or designated Iranian airlines. While no new restrictions have been announced, the advisory's publication could signal that the OFAC is taking a greater interest in the Iranian aviation sector.

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