Latest updates

Extinguishment of purchasers' rights – importance of priority in unregistered land systems
Lennox Paton
  • Private Client & Offshore Services
  • Bahamas
  • 20 June 2019

The Bahamas has an unregistered land system that is based on the conveyancing laws of England and Wales issued before 1925. Therefore, deeds and documents should be recorded in the Registry of Records in The Bahamas as soon as possible. Priority becomes particularly important in high-net-worth commercial and condominium development transactions.

Court exercises inherent jurisdiction to appoint protectors
Carey Olsen Bermuda
  • Private Client & Offshore Services
  • Bermuda
  • 20 June 2019

In a recent case, the Supreme Court delivered an important judgment in which it exercised its inherent supervisory powers over trusts to appoint protectors. The court also reaffirmed the wide breadth of its jurisdiction under Section 47 of the Trustee Act 1975 to grant trustees power to vary trusts when it is satisfied that it is expedient to do so.

International aspects to a nuptial agreement
Forsters LLP
  • Private Client & Offshore Services
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 June 2019

When one or both parties to a marriage have a connection with another country in addition to England and Wales, there are international considerations and implications to take into account when considering a nuptial agreement. This could be because of where they live, their domicile or nationality or where their assets are based. Among other things, couples should consider where an agreement should be drawn up and whether an English nuptial agreement will be upheld abroad.

ICC construction industry arbitration report
Norton Rose Fulbright
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • International
  • 20 June 2019

The International Chamber of Commerce Commission recently published an update to its report on construction industry arbitration, focusing on recommended tools and techniques for effective management. The report is a helpful reminder for practitioners and arbitrators of the procedural mechanisms available which are particularly relevant to the conduct of arbitration in the construction sector.

Award replacing contractual provisions with new terms "shocks the conscience" of Supreme Court
Khaitan & Co
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • India
  • 20 June 2019

The question of whether a contract can be amended retroactively was raised in the arbitration proceedings between Ssangyong and the National Highways Authority of India. The Supreme Court's ruling on the case is a welcome exposition on the contours of Section 34 of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, especially in relation to challenges on grounds of violations of principles of natural justice.

CCI penalises MRI machine manufacturer, but chair disagrees with market definition
Vaish Associates Advocates
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • India
  • 20 June 2019

The Competition Commission of India (CCI) recently imposed a penalty on Italian company Esaote SpA – a world leader in dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – and its Indian subsidiary. According to the CCI's order, the Esaote group had abused its dominant position in the market through its sale of dedicated standing/tilting MRI machines to the informant. However, the CCI chair disagreed with the relevant market adopted by the majority of the commission.

Green finance – a world first and a force for good which also makes economic sense
Ogier
  • Private Client & Offshore Services
  • Guernsey
  • 20 June 2019

Increasingly stark and startling messages relating to the environment and climate change are now commonplace in the media. That is why it is so refreshing to know that Guernsey is taking a leading role on the world stage and using its strengths to produce a significant positive impact, including through the implementation of the Guernsey Green Fund.

Update on economic substance rules for Jersey fund managers
Ogier
  • Private Client & Offshore Services
  • Jersey
  • 20 June 2019

The Taxation Law 2019 has introduced new economic substance requirements which apply to certain Jersey tax-resident companies. The requirements were passed to comply with the EU Code of Conduct Group on Business Taxation for the purpose of demonstrating that the profits generated by Jersey companies which carry on certain specified geographically mobile activities are commensurate with their economic activities and substantial economic presence in Jersey.

European Commission report on competition policy for digital era – key takeaways
Baker McKenzie CVBA/SCRL
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • European Union
  • 20 June 2019

The European Commission's report 'Competition policy for the digital era' is its most substantial step yet towards crystallising the dialogue on the question of how competition law could or should adapt to the rapidly changing technological landscape and the growing role of the digital economy. However, while the report touches on a wide range of ideas and proposals, it openly notes that not all of these are developed in detail or go beyond "very preliminary" conclusions.

To compete or not to compete – that is the question
Shardul Amarchand Mangaldas & Co
  • Employment & Benefits
  • India
  • 19 June 2019

Non-compete restrictions are the tool most commonly used by employers to protect their proprietary interests following the end of an employment relationship, particularly in the case of C-suite employees. However, non-compete restrictions which apply beyond the term of an employment relationship are generally unenforceable in India. That said, this does not mean that employers have no recourse whatsoever.

Often overlooked competition law aspects of restrictive covenants in contracts
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Guernsey
  • 19 June 2019

The perennial conversations around restrictive covenants in employment contracts and service contracts of a similar nature are familiar. Employers want maximum restriction on employees who leave but must be careful not to overstep the mark as covenants which are unduly restrictive risk being struck out by the courts.

Government reopens negotiations on overflight fees and airspace management
Callenders & Co
  • Aviation
  • Bahamas
  • 19 June 2019

The Bahamas' flight information region airspace comprises tens of thousands of miles and is subject to significant overflight activity. Moreover, it is one of the most important airspaces and is worth millions in revenue. To further enhance the civil aviation sector, the government is seeking to create a self-funded and sustainable management programme in order to collect overflight fees, while paying the US Federal Aviation Administration a fee for the management of its airspace.

FDFA opens consultation procedure on CLNI 2012
ThomannFischer
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Switzerland
  • 19 June 2019

The Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) recently opened a consultation procedure on the Strasbourg Convention on the Limitation of Liability in Inland Navigation 2012 and its implementation (ie, an amendment to the Swiss Maritime Navigation Act). The FDFA's proposal has been welcomed and is considered a necessary step towards Switzerland ensuring a level playing field for the inland navigation industry.

CFTC proposes updated swap data reporting regulations
Shearman & Sterling LLP
  • Derivatives
  • USA
  • 19 June 2019

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has proposed the first instalment of a series of amendments to its rules relating to swap data repositories and the reporting of swap data. The proposed amendments, which would affect Parts 23, 43, 45 and 49 of the CFTC's regulations, implement the CFTC's Roadmap to Achieve High Quality Swaps Data and are intended to improve the quality and accuracy of data available to the CFTC and the public and to streamline data reporting.

Civil aviation security: new regulations take effect
SKRINE
  • Aviation
  • Malaysia
  • 19 June 2019

The Civil Aviation (Security) Regulations 2019 (Security Regulations) recently entered into force. Among other things, the regulations have established new aviation security authorities, implemented national security programmes and introduced new security and screening controls. Passengers, operators (including aerodrome operators), ground handlers and other persons who fail to comply with the Security Regulations could face a fine of up to RM200,000 or up to five years' imprisonment (or both).

Court upholds issuance of NON-W letter and cancellation of reconsideration process for Apotex
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 19 June 2019

The Federal Court of Appeal recently affirmed the Federal Court's dismissal of Apotex's application for judicial review of a minister of health decision relating to its Apo-Omeprazole (omeprazole magnesium) delayed-release tablets. The minister had issued a Notice of Non-Compliance – Withdrawal letter in respect of Apotex's abbreviated new drug submission on the basis that the tablets were not bioequivalent to the relevant Canadian reference product.

Canada's Air Passenger Protection Regulations coming into force
Bersenas Jacobsen Chouest Thomson Blackburn LLP
  • Aviation
  • Canada
  • 19 June 2019

Following several rounds and many months of consultations, the government recently announced that the Air Passenger Protection Regulations (APPRs) developed by the Canadian Transportation Agency have been finalised. The APPRs apply to all flights within, from or to Canada, whether operated by a Canadian or foreign airline. Once in effect, the regulations will impose obligations on carriers in cases of tarmac delays, denied boarding and delayed and cancelled flights.

Federal Court dismisses Servier's application for order of prohibition regarding salt patent
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 19 June 2019

The Federal Court recently dismissed Servier's application for a prohibition order under the pre-amended Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations for Canadian Patent 2,423,825 regarding a perindopril arginine/amlodipine product (Servier's Viacoram). Apotex had alleged that the patent was invalid for obviousness, overbreadth, inutility and insufficiency.

Government publishes new violence and harassment prevention regulations for federal employers
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • 19 June 2019

The federal government has published the draft Workplace Harassment and Violence Prevention Regulations. The regulations will support the recently passed Bill C-65 and will replace the current workplace violence obligations in the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, as well as certain related provisions in the Maritime Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and the On Board Trains Occupational Safety and Health Regulations.

Quiet enjoyment letters – benefit to lenders?
Wikborg Rein
  • Shipping & Transport
  • International
  • 19 June 2019

Quiet enjoyment letters are often used where a ship, rig or other unit being financed is subject to a long-term charterparty to govern the interrelationship between the owner, its financiers and the charterer. They provide the charterer with a right to the undisturbed use and enjoyment of the ship, independent of whether the owner in its capacity as borrower is in default of its obligations towards its lender under the loan agreement. But do quiet enjoyment letters have any benefit for lenders?

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