Litigation, Ireland updates

Recent rulings on state aid
Matheson
  • Ireland
  • 08 October 2019

Two recent Irish court rulings have helped to shed light on the role of the national courts in state aid cases. These cases are particularly relevant as the role of the courts is likely to continue to grow in importance for Irish clients in the coming years. In the first, the Supreme Court strongly affirmed the Circuit Court's jurisdiction to hear state aid allegations. In the second, the High Court determined that examinership does not trump a state aid decision from the European Commission ordering recovery.

Defender v HSBC: impact of settling with one concurrent wrongdoer
  • Ireland
  • 23 April 2019

Defender v HSBC highlights the need for plaintiffs to understand the blameworthiness of all wrongdoers before settling a claim against any of them. This case concerned Defender, a fund which invested with Bernard Madoff and subsequently suffered a loss when Madoff was revealed to be operating the world's largest Ponzi scheme.

Delay in professional negligence claims
  • Ireland
  • 16 April 2019

The High Court recently dealt with a professional negligence claim following a retainer by a couple of a chartered engineering firm regarding the construction of their home in 2005. The defendants had brought a strike-out claim for a significant delay in the construction proceedings. On the facts of the case and owing to the fact that the defendant had been a professional person, the case was allowed to proceed on a limited basis.

Discovery process reaches crisis point: Supreme Court to consider reform
  • Ireland
  • 26 March 2019

Businesses with experience litigating in Ireland will be familiar with the discovery process and the onerous obligation to disclose all relevant documents which are in their power, possession or procurement. In an age when the volume of electronically stored information continues to increase exponentially, the costs and time involved in complying with discovery orders can often be disproportionate; however, change may be on the horizon.

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