Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co updates

Coronavirus and labour law
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 25 March 2020

The ongoing global outbreak and spread of novel coronavirus 2019 is a dramatic event of global proportions, with far-reaching implications for a wide range of areas, including labour law. The increasing number of individuals subjected to isolation raises many questions among employers and employees, including as regards days of absence, remote work and similar matters.

District court clarifies status of Section 102 shares held in trust
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Corporate Tax
  • Israel
  • 13 March 2020

On 16 December 2019 the Haifa District Court determined that so long as shares awarded pursuant to Section 102 of the Israeli Income Tax Ordinance (New Version) are held by a trustee for the benefit of a grantee, they confer no shareholder rights on the grantee. The judgment also reinforced the practice of requiring Section 102 grantees to sign an irrevocable proxy.

Employing experts and foreign employees in Israel
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 28 February 2020

In this era of globalisation, there is a growing need for companies and business organisations to relocate foreign workers in order to perform various tasks that require knowledge, expertise or proven management capabilities (whether these tasks be permanent, long term or temporary). This article outlines the steps that employers should take in order to employ foreign workers.

Employees' social rights: Employment of Women Law
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 19 February 2020

The Employment of Women Law entitles both women and men to certain parental rights, including limitations on the fields of work available to pregnant women, limitations on women's night shifts, the protection of employment during pregnancy, maternity leave (for both women and men) and limitations on termination of employment.

Terminating employment: hearing processes
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 29 January 2020

Israeli employment laws set certain limitations on employers' right to terminate employees. For example, according to case law, the termination of employment relationships requires a hearing process, for which specific guidelines have been developed by the labour courts. Employers' obligation to hear an employee before making a final decision regarding their future employment results from employees' basic right to be heard and derives from the rules of natural justice and bona fide obligations.

Tax implications of sale of functions, assets and risks to affiliates
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Corporate Tax
  • Israel
  • 17 January 2020

In a recent decision, a district court in Israel ruled in favour of Broadcom Semiconductor Ltd and rejected the Israeli Tax Authority's claim that Broadcom Semiconductor was required to pay additional taxes of NIS100 million due to the deemed sale of its main functions and assets to affiliated companies. In its decision, the court ruled that a change of a company's business model would not necessarily be deemed as a sale of its assets (and, in particular, a sale of its intellectual property).

Weekly rest requirements for employees in Israel
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 15 January 2020

Pursuant to Israeli employment law, an employer cannot employ workers on their weekly rest days unless it obtains a special permit from the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. On commencement of their employment, employees can notify their employer that they will not work on weekly rest days in accordance with their religious beliefs. Employing workers on their rest day without a permit is a criminal offence, which in certain cases may result in fines for the employer's officers and managers.

Digital tax developments
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Corporate Tax
  • Israel
  • 13 December 2019

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) set a goal to deliver by 2020 a final report that includes a consensus approach with respect to the challenges of the digital economy, both the allocation of taxation rights (pillar one) and Base Erosion and Profit Shifting issues (pillar two). What are the latest proposals of the OECD and where does Israel stand?

Digital tax developments
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Corporate Tax
  • Israel
  • 06 December 2019

This article has been removed at the request of the contributing firm.

Israeli labour and employment law – an overview
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 20 November 2019

Israeli employment law is a blend of continental and common law legal systems. Employment protection laws – a set of laws that provide minimum conditions for all employees, irrespective of their wage levels – are at the foundation of employment law in Israel. Failure to comply with these requirements may constitute a criminal offence and further expose an employer to liability for damages.

Legal aspects of organised labour
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 17 July 2019

Collective labour law in Israel is a dynamic and constantly evolving field. In the past decade, many important changes have taken place with respect to collective labour law which have greatly influenced the scope of organised labour. This article examines the legal aspects of organised labour, the protection of the right to organise and the support granted by the labour courts to organisers and the definition of collective bargaining units and workers' organisations.

Foreign worker permits: frequently asked questions
Fischer Behar Chen Well Orion & Co
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Israel
  • 15 February 2019

Israeli and international organisations seeking to employ foreign workers in Israel in management positions or in positions that require special expertise or training must apply for a foreign expert work permit (B/1 permit) from the Population and Immigration Authority. The employment of foreign workers without a proper work permit constitutes a criminal offence, which may lead to fines and other criminal penalties being levied on the employer and its senior management, as well as on the employees.

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