Fasken updates

Court rules sharing confidential information is just cause for termination
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • April 25 2018

When privacy and confidentiality are important in a job, a manager's breach of confidence may provide just cause for termination, particularly when the employer's policy on confidentiality obligations is known to the employee. The British Columbia Supreme Court recently affirmed these principles and highlighted the value of a properly executed release if the employee later challenges an agreement made at the time of termination.

How to enforce termination provisions: latest from Ontario Court of Appeal
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • April 18 2018

For years, lawyers have debated whether a termination clause must specifically state that the employee will not be entitled to common law reasonable notice in order to limit his or her entitlements upon termination. According to a recent Ontario Court of Appeal decision, the answer is no. The decision has also confirmed that a termination clause need not address all of the employee's statutory entitlements in order for it to be valid.

Bill 148: scheduling and the three-hour rule
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • April 04 2018

The Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act 2017 (known as 'Bill 148') is now in force and has made significant changes to the Employment Standards Act 2000. Included in the changes to the act are new provisions on scheduling, including on-call work, changes to scheduled shifts and shift cancellation. Although these changes do not come into effect until January 1 2019, employers should be aware of them in order to ensure compliance in time.

Handle with care: importance of measured response to poisoned workplace complaint
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • March 28 2018

Whether a poisoned workplace justifies a claim for constructive dismissal depends on the facts. The key question is whether the employer fundamentally breached its obligation to provide a safe and harassment-free workplace. The Alberta Court of Queen's Bench recently addressed the issue of how an employer can properly address a poisoned workplace complaint to ensure that it adequately cares for its employees and minimises its liability exposure.

Bill 148: changes to Labour Relations Act
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • March 21 2018

The impact of the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act 2017 (known as 'Bill 148') has been overshadowed, to some extent, by the controversy surrounding the sweeping changes to the Employment Standards Act 2000, including the changes to the minimum wage. However, the bill has also made significant changes to the Labour Relations Act 1995.

Bill 148: significant changes affecting agency employees
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • March 14 2018

One of the government's primary goals when enacting the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act 2017 (known as 'Bill 148') was to provide additional protections for vulnerable employees, including individuals employed by temporary help agencies. As such, the changes will have a significant effect on both temporary help agencies and the companies that use their services.

Court gives asset purchasers leeway with employment offers
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • March 07 2018

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently overturned a Superior Court decision and ruled that a purchaser's employment offer, in and of itself, constitutes sufficient consideration to establish a valid employment contract. Further, asset purchasers are neither bound by the terms of the seller's employment agreements nor required to offer the seller's employees contracts on terms identical to their original agreements.

Reduce risk of accident by investigating near misses
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • February 28 2018

Most employers have a procedure for investigating accidents in the workplace. However, less likely to be investigated are near misses that may have gone unreported because of the workplace culture or because they were not viewed as important. While it may seem that investigating a near miss is not worth the time and energy, in the long run, it is likely to uncover unknown hazards or conditions which may result in a serious injury or fatality.

Bill 148: equal pay for equal work
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • February 21 2018

Included among the many changes to the Employment Standards Act 2000 brought about by the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act 2017 (known as 'Bill 148') is the prohibition on paying certain employees less than others based on their employment status. This means that employers can no longer pay part-time employees less than full-time employees if they perform substantially the same kind of work in the same establishment.

Bill 148: changes to existing leaves of absence and new types of leave for Ontario employees
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • February 14 2018

Included among the many changes to the Employment Standards Act, 2000 brought about by the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017 (referred to as 'Bill 148') are changes to existing leaves of absence and the introduction of new leaves of absence for Ontario employees. Employers should review and update their existing policies to ensure compliance with Bill 148, keeping in mind the changes and additions that are now in effect.

Alberta workers' compensation: a refocus
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • January 17 2018

In 2016 the Alberta government commissioned an evaluation of the entire workers' compensation system. In July 2017 the Alberta Workers' Compensation Board review panel issued a report which found that employers and workers overwhelmingly wanted the system to continue. However, significant problems exist and, based on these findings, the panel issued a list of recommendations. While the extent to which the government adopts these recommendations remains to be seen, further debate is likely.

Dismissals for incompetence: are we moving backward or forward?
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • January 10 2018

Employers in Quebec that wish to dismiss employees for incompetence may now need to accomplish an additional step before doing so, following the Quebec Superior Court's recent confirmation of an arbitration decision in which an additional criterion was added to those previously established by the Court of Appeal. According to the superior court, employers must also verify whether another more suitable role is available for an employee before proceeding with termination.

Government enhances maternity leave benefits and protection against workplace harassment
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • December 20 2017

Changes to the employment insurance programme relating to parental, maternity and caregiving benefits came into effect on December 3 2017. The employment insurance programme provides temporary income support to partially replace lost employment income for individuals who are off work for various reasons. The government also recently announced legislation to strengthen existing laws on the prevention of harassment and violence in federally regulated workplaces.

Win for employers: Supreme Court rejects union's request for right to consultation in accommodation process
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • December 06 2017

The Supreme Court recently dismissed an application from the Telecommunications Workers' Union for leave to appeal the decision that unions have no independent legal right, separate and apart from their collective agreement rights, to be involved in every unionised employee's accommodation request. The decision is a victory for employers, employee privacy and the accommodation process.

Avoiding liability risks on termination for sexual harassment
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • November 29 2017

The risks to employers in sexual harassment cases can be big. Potential liability can arise from any decision and employers may find themselves having to make tough decisions on tight timelines. The key to ensuring an appropriate response is to be prepared. Preparation will permit an employer to take a proactive approach, as opposed to a reactive stance, when sexual harassment is discovered. This is a lesson that can be drawn from a recent Alberta Court of Queen's Bench case.

Erosion of employers' managerial rights
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • November 22 2017

An arbitrator and the Quebec Superior Court recently challenged the well-established principle in labour relations that an employer retains managerial rights in the absence of limiting provisions in a collective agreement. The arbitrator and the court found that the employer had violated the collective agreement because it contained no clear provision that allowed it to act as it did. Therefore, the question remains: what is happening to managerial rights and what measures can employers take to protect them?

Once bitten, twice shy: greater scrutiny ahead for employees misclassified as contractors
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • November 15 2017

Ontario has announced that it will be cracking down on employers that misclassify workers as independent contractors as part of its Bill 148: Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act 2017. The bill will place the burden on employers to prove that workers are not employees for the purposes of the Employment Standards Act, reflecting a growing concern among legislators across Canada that workers and employers are operating outside of the traditional employer-employee framework.

British Columbia Labour Relations Board rules on secondary picketing at non-striking facility
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • November 08 2017

In British Columbia secondary picketing is unlawful unless the striking union can obtain a declaration that the secondary business or location has allied itself with the struck employer. Suppliers and other affected businesses can arrange their affairs to work around strikes and lockouts without being declared an ally – so-called 'self-help' is permitted by such third parties. A recent British Columbia Labour Relations Board decision has analysed self-help in a new way, making it more difficult to avoid secondary pickets.

Walking the line between termination and resignation
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • October 25 2017

For Canadian employers, navigating the distinction between resignation and termination can be complicated. If an employee resigns, there is no entitlement to severance. If an employee is terminated without cause, the employer is liable for termination pay (and possibly severance pay in Ontario and the federal jurisdiction). A recent Alberta ruling highlights that mistakes in distinguishing between termination and resignation can be costly.

Advertising before recruiting: stringent requirements when hiring foreign workers
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • October 18 2017

Changes to the way that employers must advertise their job openings and assess job applications have come into effect in Canada. Employers advertising high-wage roles to foreign workers must conduct three different recruitment activities and advertise the vacant role on the government's Job Bank and two other platforms before submitting a labour market impact assessment to show that foreign workers are needed for the job.

Current search