Latest updates

Secondment – preparing contracts
Allen & Overy Praha
  • Employment & Benefits
  • European Union
  • 17 October 2018

Sending employees on secondments to company sites in other countries is a major issue in cross-border employment law. It is often a popular way of deepening cross-border cooperation, particularly in terms of transferring know-how and securing closer contact with foreign branches. Employers increasingly wish to fall back on instruments of this kind, especially in preparation for Brexit. In legal terms, particular focus should be placed on drafting contracts.

New maximum hiring out period expires for some contractors
CMS
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Germany
  • 17 October 2018

In view of a statutory transition clause in the Temporary Employment Act, for some deployment agencies the 18-month maximum hiring out period will end shortly – for external employees deployed as of 1 April 2017, the expiry date could have been the end of September 2018. To avoid all possible risk of overstepping the maximum hiring out period, personnel services providers and companies using such providers are advised to determine precisely what they consider the expiration date to be.

Criterion under Jobs Act to determine indemnity in case of dismissal deemed unlawful
Stanchi Studio Legale
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Italy
  • 17 October 2018

The Constitutional Court has deemed unlawful the provision of the Jobs Act concerning indemnity in the case of the unlawful dismissal of employees hired after March 2015. According to the court's first press release, the sole criterion of an employee's seniority provided by the act for the calculation of the indemnity is contrary to the principles of reasonableness and equality, as well as the employment rights and protection provided by Articles 4 and 35 of the Constitutional Chart.

Enumeration breakdown – Court of Appeals examines what constitutes a 'unit' under Hague-Visby Rules
Wikborg Rein
  • Shipping & Transport
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 October 2018

In a recent case concerning the enumeration of units for the limitation of containerised cargo, the Court of Appeals was asked to determine whether the Hague-Visby Rules are compulsorily applicable if a bill of lading is not issued, what constitutes a 'unit' under the rules and what enumeration of cargo is required under Article IV.5(c) of the rules. The claim arose following damage to a cargo of frozen bluefin tuna packed into three refrigerated containers, which had occurred during carriage from Cartagena to Japan.

Overtime regulation bill enacted
Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Japan
  • 17 October 2018

The National Diet recently enacted a bill relating to work style reform, which has amended the Labour Standards Act, the Industrial Safety and Health Act and relevant laws. Most amendments will come into effect on 1 April 2019. The amended Labour Standards Act stipulates that the upper limit for overtime will be, in principle, 45 hours a month and 360 hours a year. However, there are exceptions for certain business sectors.

Judgment on public procurement puts parallel importers at a disadvantage
Advokatfirman Lindahl
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Sweden
  • 17 October 2018

The Stockholm Administrative Court recently ruled that the obligation on tenderers of public procurements of medicinal products to have routines which ensure that the use and handling of active ingredients would have as little effect on the environment as possible, as well as the obligation that they routinely survey and have dialogue with their subcontractors, were permissible. The decision has been appealed to the Administrative Court of Appeal in Stockholm, which has yet to make a decision.

Chancery court allows Straight Path stockholders to pursue direct claims against company's former controlling stockholder
Ropes & Gray LLP
  • Corporate Finance/M&A
  • USA
  • 17 October 2018

The Delaware Court of Chancery recently denied a motion to dismiss the claims of Straight Path Communi­cations Inc's stockholders against the company's controlling shareholder. The background of this case involved IDT, which is controlled by its former CEO, Howard Jonas, and was Straight Path's former parent company. When IDT spun out Straight Path, it agreed to indemnify Straight Path for liabilities arising from pre-spin-off conduct.

Suspension without pay and constructive dismissal: a refresher
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • 17 October 2018

Despite agreeing with a trial judge that a casino employee's suspension without pay was a constructive dismissal, the Ontario Court of Appeal reversed the trial judge's award on the question of damages and examined whether the employer had been obliged to offer alternate employment. The court's decision is a reminder of the principles governing suspension without pay during an investigation into employee misconduct.

Court rules employers can require employees to execute arbitration agreements with class or collective action waivers
Mayer Brown LLP
  • Employment & Benefits
  • USA
  • 17 October 2018

A unanimous panel of the Sixth Circuit recently held that the Fair Labour Standards Act does not prohibit employers from requiring employees to execute arbitration agreements with class or collective action waivers. The decision joins those from other federal courts of appeal in holding that claims under the Fair Labour Standards Act are subject to agreements to arbitrate on an individual basis.

Parental bereavement bill receives royal assent
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 October 2018

The Parental Bereavement (Pay and Leave) Bill recently received royal assent to become the Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Act 2018. The act entitles employed parents who have lost a child to take statutory paid leave to allow them time to grieve. The new rights are expected to come into force in 2020.

Health Canada to implement further pre-market transparency initiatives for prescription drugs
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 17 October 2018

Health Canada recently announced that it will move forward with Phase III of its prescription drug product transparency initiatives. As of 1 October 2018, the Health Products and Food Branch will implement five proposals discussed in its April 2018 What We Heard report concerning regulatory decision summaries and information in the Submissions Under Review List.

Health Canada releases statistical report on PMNOC Regulations and data protection
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 17 October 2018

Health Canada recently released the Therapeutic Products Directorate Statistical Report 2017/2018, which provided an overview of its administration of the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations and data protection regime. The report includes information regarding trends in listing on the Patent Register and the Register of Innovative Drugs, as well as related court activity.

Unsteady grounds – Labour Court doubles award in disability discrimination case
Mason Hayes & Curran
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Ireland
  • 17 October 2018

Employers cannot be expected to hold positions open indefinitely for employees who are absent on extended sick leave. However, as confirmed in a recent Labour Court determination, where an employer proposes to dismiss an employee on the grounds of incapacity or a disability, it is essential that the decision is made based on up-to-date medical advice. Otherwise, the employer may be exposed to claims of discriminatory dismissal or failure to reasonably accommodate the employee.

Registered alternative investment funds – an overview
  • Capital Markets
  • Cyprus
  • 16 October 2018

Cyprus recently introduced a law which aims to modernise its investment fund legislative regime and allows for the establishment of a new type of investment vehicle: the registered alternative investment fund (RAIF). The RAIF is a hybrid legal creature that combines the elements of authorised and regulated funds without extensive bureaucracy or, more importantly, the need for an operating authorisation from the Cyprus Securities and Exchange Commission.

Grand Court examines master-feeder redemption procedures
  • Litigation
  • Cayman Islands
  • 16 October 2018

A recent Grand Court decision is significant for Cayman master-feeder fund structures. Funds and their advisers should review the redemption provisions in master fund articles of association and partnership agreements to ensure that, operationally, redemptions are being effected in accordance with such documents.

Contractor imprisoned for manslaughter: a first in Quebec legal history
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 16 October 2018

An excavation contractor who was found guilty of manslaughter and criminal negligence causing death has been sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment by the Court of Quebec. The sentence – which is a first in Quebec legal history – sends a clear message to employers concerning the importance of complying with their occupational health and safety obligations.

Reciprocal enforcement of mainland and Hong Kong civil judgments
RPC
  • Litigation
  • Hong Kong
  • 16 October 2018

The Hong Kong government recently issued a consultation paper, and sought views from members of the public and interested stakeholders, on a proposed arrangement between Hong Kong and the mainland for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters. The proposed arrangement seeks to provide a mechanism which widens the existing and limited scope for the enforcement of mainland court civil judgments in Hong Kong and vice versa.

Court of Appeal rules on interpretation of court decisions
Luther SA
  • Litigation
  • Luxembourg
  • 16 October 2018

The plaintiff in a recent Court of Appeal case concerning the enforcement of a pledge on shares given to a bank as part of a financing believed that the court's original decision was unclear. It consequently asked the court to clarify whether the decision ordering the return of the shares entailed that the plaintiff should be considered a shareholder from the date on which the bank had unlawfully acquired the shares or effectively returned them to the plaintiff.

Misrepresentation in franchising – important lessons from recent High Court case
Fieldfisher LLP
  • Franchising
  • United Kingdom
  • 16 October 2018

Four former Vision Express franchisees were recently successful in their claim against their franchisor, in which they alleged that they had been induced to enter into their franchise agreements on the basis of false information provided by a Vision Express employee. The case highlights the importance of ensuring that a franchisor's employees stay on message during the sales process and information which is provided to prospective franchisees is scrutinised to ensure its accuracy and relevance to the investment.

Oil or nothing: Court of Appeal considers damages in continuing misrepresentation claim
RPC
  • Litigation
  • United Kingdom
  • 16 October 2018

The Court of Appeal recently held that a director who had made continuing fraudulent misrepresentations was liable for damages calculated at the point of sale and not at the point of entering into the contract. This judgment is a reminder that, in the right case, deceit may be used to pierce the corporate veil. It also highlights the considerations when assessing damages regarding continuing representations, particularly when there is time between the representation being made and the performance of the contract.

Current search

Refine search

Work area

Jurisdiction

Firm