Latest updates

High court rules that non-parties to arbitration are not bound by confidentiality
Shearn Delamore & Co
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Malaysia
  • 17 October 2019

A high court recently ruled that the prohibition against third parties publishing, disclosing or communicating information relating to arbitration proceedings does not extend to non-parties to an arbitration. This decision will affect the extent to which the confidential documents used in arbitral proceedings remain confidential.

Fraud claims in letter of guarantee not subject to arbitration clause in underlying contract
Global Law Office
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • China
  • 17 October 2019

An independent letter of guarantee involves a legal relationship between the applicant, the issuer and the beneficiary. Without an arbitration clause in a letter of guarantee, it is unclear whether the arbitration clause in the underlying contract can also bind the issuer. A recent Supreme People's Court ruling provides a clear answer to this question.

Recent developments regarding attorney-client privilege
Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Japan
  • 17 October 2019

According to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Japan is one of only three OECD jurisdictions to not recognise attorney-client privilege. In response to discussions and lobbying, the Diet has announced amendments to the Anti-monopoly Law which will partially introduce attorney-client privilege in administrative investigations pursuant to ordinances under the law or certain prescribed guidelines.

Data protection and cyber-risk issues in arbitration: regulation, cyberattacks and hacked evidence
Norton Rose Fulbright
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • International
  • 17 October 2019

Data protection and cybersecurity are hot topics in international arbitration and international surveys demonstrate that users of arbitration are concerned about data security. While there are signs that the market is listening, users seem to think that institutions, counsel and tribunals could do more to address cybersecurity. As these issues become more common, it is hoped that consistent practices will emerge to reassure users that their data will be secure.

CPC fines snack distributor for unfair solicitation of customers
Schoenherr
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Bulgaria
  • 17 October 2019

The Commission on the Protection of Competition (CPC) recently fined a snack distributor 4% of its annual turnover for the unfair solicitation of customers. The commission relied on its earlier practice to determine whether a promotional campaign launched by the distributor had infringed the Competition Protection Act. This decision is a helpful reminder that in order to avoid competition law violations, companies must carefully consider which prizes to offer in promotional campaigns.

Class discrimination and the workplace: TUC proposes new laws
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 16 October 2019

The Trades Union Congress (TUC) recently published its recommendations for eliminating class-based bias in society. Its report points to a number of statistics demonstrating that working-class individuals suffer disadvantage in the employment sphere. As such, the TUC has proposed (among other things) the introduction of compulsory class pay gap reporting for all employers.

Amended PMNOC Regulations: second anniversary update
Smart & Biggar
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 16 October 2019

The amended Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations, which came into force in 2017, heralded significant changes to the landscape for pharmaceutical companies in Canada. Among other changes, the amendments ended dual litigation and provided innovators with a right of appeal. This article provides an update as of the second anniversary of the amendments.

Innovators commence court challenges regarding recent amendments to Patented Medicines Regulations
Smart & Biggar
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 16 October 2019

The recent amendments to the Patented Medicines Regulations have been the subject of two court challenges launched by groups of innovative pharmaceutical companies – one in the Quebec Superior Court and the other in the Federal Court. The applicants before the Quebec court brought a constitutional challenge to the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board provisions of the Patent Act and the regulations, while the applicants before the Federal Court challenged the validity of the amending regulations.

Discounted tariffs: change of legal position?
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Aviation
  • Germany
  • 16 October 2019

A recent Frankfurt am Main Local Court decision is a useful reminder that in the event of an assertion of claims under the EU Flight Delay Compensation Regulation, the associated booking conditions must be considered when determining claim validity. Ultimately, travellers with access to corporate customer tariffs between their employer and the airline cannot claim compensation if their flight – whether for professional or private purposes – is delayed or cancelled.

Thirty-month notice of termination ruling overturned
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • 16 October 2019

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently reaffirmed that the upper limit for reasonable notice remains 24 months, absent exceptional circumstances. This decision is a reminder of the importance of well-drafted employment contracts, particularly with regard to an employee's entitlements on termination.

New crowdfunding platform regulations
Gorodissky & Partners
  • Corporate Finance/M&A
  • Russia
  • 16 October 2019

The president recently signed Federal Law 259-FZ of 2 August 2019 on Raising Investments via Investment Platforms and on Amending Certain Legislative Acts of the Russian Federation. The law, which is set to take effect from 1 January 2020, reflects the growing trend in Russia of increased regulation of digital economy issues.

Freedom of expression versus work obligations
Lander & Rogers
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Australia
  • 16 October 2019

The Federal Court recently upheld an employee's dismissal, which had occurred after he criticised his law firm's clients in an opinion piece in two newspapers. While the court's decision is not a green light for employers to terminate employees who express political views, it is a reminder for employers and employees that a failure to follow a lawful and reasonable direction may justify termination of employment (depending on the circumstances of the case).

Milan court sets precedent on second medical use invention plausibility
Hogan Lovells
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Italy
  • 16 October 2019

Few Italian precedents have considered the plausibility of a second medical use invention as a potential requirement for patent validity. However, a recent decision has clearly stated for the first time and as a matter of principle that the plausibility of an invention does not need the support of experimental data; rather, credible information based on a sound scientific and technical rationale is sufficient.

Supreme Court overturns dismissal based on employee's covert recording of conversation with employer
Norrbom Vinding
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Denmark
  • 16 October 2019

The Supreme Court recently held that an employer had been unjustified to summarily dismiss an employee with retroactive effect after discovering that he had covertly recorded a conversation with his manager. The court had to decide whether the employee's secret audio recording could be regarded as a material breach of the employment relationship and justify summary dismissal.

Gateway to The Bahamas: runway rehabilitation project
Callenders & Co
  • Aviation
  • Bahamas
  • 16 October 2019

In recent years, there has been significant growth in air traffic to and from The Bahamas. As a result, the government has taken proactive steps to support this growth – notably, with upgrades to several of the country's busiest airports. For example, the Nassau Airport Development Company recently commenced a major rehabilitation project at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This project will, among other things, include an asphalt upgrade to increase the runway's lifespan.

Outsourcing: a new paradigm
CGM Advogados
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Brazil
  • 16 October 2019

In a recent decision, the Supreme Court addressed an important question relating to the day-to-day activities of companies operating in Brazil: is the outsourcing of services allowed without restriction or should it be limited to non-core business activities, as set out by Precedent 331 of the Superior Labour Court? This decision is relevant because it will affect the standards adopted by the Brazilian labour courts in relation to outsourcing.

Due diligence requirements regarding share ownership and related compliance in M&A transactions
Meyerlustenberger Lachenal
  • Corporate Finance/M&A
  • Switzerland
  • 16 October 2019

In Swiss M&A practice, share deals remain the most common method of acquiring a business from a third party for several reasons. Due to strict Federal Supreme Court precedents, legal due diligence regarding share ownership and related compliance has always been a fundamental component of legal due diligence in Swiss share deals. Recent legislative changes have further increased the importance of thorough due diligence in this regard.

Permission to appeal order for production of documents to liquidators refused
RPC
  • Litigation
  • Hong Kong
  • 15 October 2019

The Court of Appeal has refused permission to appeal an apparently wide-ranging order for the production of documents made in favour of the liquidators in China Medical Technologies Inc v Tsang. Despite the respondent's best efforts, the Court of Appeal decided that the issues stated to arise out of its judgment did not raise questions of great general or public importance. The outcome of the appeal is bolstered by a legislative amendment which amounts to a more coextensive power.

Supreme Court upholds first-instance decision on fraudulent transfer of shares
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Litigation
  • Cyprus
  • 15 October 2019

​The Supreme Court recently confirmed a first-instance decision which had annulled a transfer of shares by a debtor to his son. The Supreme Court found that the debtor had acted fraudulently to prevent his creditor from executing a court judgment which had been issued in the creditor's favour. The Supreme Court also found that the issuance of a decree on the sale of shares as a means of enforcing the decision against the debtor was possible.

Liquidator held liable for omitting claims arising from ongoing litigation
Luther SA
  • Litigation
  • Luxembourg
  • 15 October 2019

In a 2018 decision, the Luxembourg District Court found a liquidator liable for damages which the plaintiffs had suffered as a result of the early closure of the liquidation while legal proceedings were still ongoing. The court held that since the liquidator had personally received the document instituting the proceedings, he should not have ignored any claims that might have arisen from the ongoing dispute. Notably, the court went even further by also holding the liquidation auditor liable.

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