International updates

Arbitration & ADR

Data protection and cyber-risk issues in arbitration: regulation, cyberattacks and hacked evidence
Norton Rose Fulbright LLP
  • International
  • 17 October 2019

Data protection and cybersecurity are hot topics in international arbitration and international surveys demonstrate that users of arbitration are concerned about data security. While there are signs that the market is listening, users seem to think that institutions, counsel and tribunals could do more to address cybersecurity. As these issues become more common, it is hoped that consistent practices will emerge to reassure users that their data will be secure.

Singapore Convention: update on enforcing mediated settlement agreements
  • International
  • 10 October 2019

The United Nations Convention on International Settlement Agreements Resulting from Mediation (Singapore Convention) has been signed by 46 states and will come into force six months after being ratified by at least three state parties. The convention responds to the demand from a growing body of mediation users for an enforcement mechanism applicable to mediated settlement agreements in cross-border disputes. However, its language has created some uncertainties.

Recent developments in ISDS reform: the big picture
Norton Rose Fulbright LLP
  • International
  • 03 October 2019

Investor-state dispute settlement is an important feature of investment treaties as it is the procedural mechanism through which investors can claim compensation for a violation of a substantive investor-protection standard. The traditional mechanism (ie, investment arbitration between the investor and the host state, modelled on commercial arbitration) has been increasingly criticised. Hostility to the traditional model has led to changes in individual treaties and wider reform initiatives.

Arbitrating M&A disputes: changes in arbitration landscape and the impact of technology
Norton Rose Fulbright LLP
  • International
  • 26 September 2019

M&A lawyers mitigate buyer risk through expansive due diligence exercises and tight contractual controls. Arbitration has become a prominent forum for resolving these disputes. For example, the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA) has reported a significant increase in the number of shareholder, share purchase and joint venture agreements being referred to LCIA arbitration. This article examines the growth of arbitration as a forum for resolving such disputes.

Resolving telecoms disputes involving state entities in the Middle East
Obeid Law Firm
  • International
  • 29 August 2019

As the economy becomes increasingly data focused, telecoms markets across the Middle East are changing considerably. The policy framework has not always kept pace with this rapid change, and aspects of telecoms regulations are now outdated. However, personal data protection and public-private partnership (PPP) laws are starting to affect telecoms contracts and investments. Specifically, PPP laws are enabling recourse to alternative dispute resolution methods, including arbitration.


Aviation

New trends and challenges in aviation sector
Studio Pierallini
  • International
  • 25 March 2020

According to the 2020 edition of Deloitte's Global Aerospace and Defence Industry Outlook, commercial aircraft manufacturing is going to reach 1,900 aircraft compared with the 1,450 estimated in 2019. Electric-powered aircraft, urban air mobility and automated flight decks are the main goals that the aviation industry must address in terms of technology and digital processes, with the aim of improving productivity and efficiency to meet the high expectations placed on the sector.

Three takeaways from COVID-19 crisis for improved customer care
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • International
  • 25 March 2020

The impact of the coronavirus outbreak on the airline industry has been severe, with estimated losses of approximately $113 billion. The challenge for air carriers is how to handle a high volume of claims with a reduced workforce for an indefinite period. In that respect, the automation and digitisation of the claims handling processes can help airlines to handle more claims in less time and be flexible concerning their headcount and the volume of cases to be processed on a daily basis.

New year, new liability under Montreal Convention
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • International
  • 26 February 2020

As of 28 December 2019, the limitations of liability in the Montreal Convention were adjusted. The last adjustment was made in 2009. Prior to that, the liability amounts had remained unchanged for 10 years. The new limits of liability apply to damaging events during air transport which were carried out after the amendments came into force.

Revised limits of liability under Montreal Convention
Augusta Abogados
  • International
  • 12 February 2020

New limits of liability under the Montreal Convention 1999 recently came into force following the International Civil Aviation Organisation's review procedure under Article 24 of the convention. Airlines should update their general conditions on carriage, information for passengers and insurance policies, when needed, so that they reflect the revised limits of liability.

Letters of credit in aircraft leasing: a refresher
Vedder Price PC
  • International
  • 15 January 2020

Letters of credit are often issued in aircraft leasing transactions as an alternative to the provision of a cash security deposit and, less frequently, the obligation to pay maintenance reserves in cash. In an airline bankruptcy scenario, it is important to understand the differences that exist between different forms of letter of credit and some of the challenges that may arise for an enforcing lessor or financier.


Construction

Updated FIDIC contracts 2017 – what has changed?
  • International
  • 14 May 2018

The International Federation of Consulting Engineers (FIDIC) Contracts Committee recently unveiled the much-anticipated new suite of rainbow contracts, with the publication of amended Red, Yellow and Silver Books. The changes reflect only some of the key amendments introduced by the revised 2017 FIDIC contracts. Nevertheless, the changes are significant and it will undoubtedly take time for contracting parties to become familiar with the revised contracts.


Corporate Finance/M&A

Addressing #MeToo in M&A
  • International
  • 17 April 2019

Companies in all industries are facing heightened reputational and legal risks in the #MeToo era, as employees are more likely to identify and report instances of misconduct or discrimination in the workplace (and such instances are more likely to become public). In the world of M&A, reputational and legal risks are ultimately risks to the bottom line – prompting private equity sponsors, institutional investors and strategic purchasers to focus on #MeToo issues when sourcing, diligencing and negotiating investments.


Derivatives

COVID-19: derivatives implications
Shearman & Sterling LLP
  • International
  • 25 March 2020

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has implications for derivatives contracts. For example, some companies are asserting that the reported disruptions in the global supply chain and travel restrictions constitute a force majeure, which is a legal basis for excusing non-performance and a right to terminate under contracts. This article examines certain issues that market participants may wish to consider when evaluating the potential impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on their outstanding derivatives contracts.