Latest updates

Changes ahoy! New Maritime Code enacted
Kegels & Co
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Belgium
  • 24 April 2019

The Chamber of Representatives recently enacted the new Maritime Code, which will replace – to a large extent, but not completely – numerous provisions in several existing codes. The new code is over 470 pages long and consequently cannot be explained in a few lines; however, this article highlights some of the major changes that will be introduced in relation to existing legislation.

Light goods + heavy pallets x 8.33 special drawing rights?
Arnecke Sibeth Dabelstein
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Germany
  • 24 April 2019

How should the weight of a shipment containing damaged goods but usable pallets be calculated, considering that this would form the basis for liability? According to a recent Federal Court of Justice decision, if the pallets are still usable, only the net weight of the goods counts. The court held that it is necessary to look closely at what has been damaged, as the fate of some items is not necessarily the fate of others.

When are mandatory arbitration clauses unenforceable?
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • 24 April 2019

A recent Ontario-based decision creates uncertainty for many Canadian and international employers operating in Canada that include mandatory arbitration clauses in employment or independent contractor agreements, because each province has a similar rule against contracting out of employment standards legislation. If the clauses could be interpreted as limiting the right to file a complaint with the Ministry of Labour or another employment standards regulator, they should be reviewed and revised by the company's lawyers.

Bunker supply and VAT
Venetucci & Asociados
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Argentina
  • 24 April 2019

The question of whether foreign-flagged ships involved in international trade are subject to value added tax (VAT) when supplying bunkers in Argentina is frequently posed. If a vessel is supplied bunkers in one Argentine port and subsequently calls to another Argentine port before proceeding overseas, this is generally considered to be cabotage and is therefore subject to VAT.

Salary continuation for incapacitated employees
Rihm Rechtsanwälte
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Switzerland
  • 24 April 2019

The basic rule 'no wages without work' dictates that employees who perform no work, including those deemed incapable of working, should not receive wages. However, Swiss employment law provides for exceptions in some circumstances. This article addresses the circumstances in which employers must continue to pay employees who are unable to work, how long employers must continue to pay such employees and the circumstances in which employers may request medical certificates.

Who's liable for damage caused by employees?
Castegnaro
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Luxembourg
  • 24 April 2019

The Labour Code establishes a dual responsibility in employment relationships – namely, employers are liable for risks generated by their company's activity and employees are liable for damage caused by their wilful acts or gross negligence. In principle, for the courts to hold an employee responsible for wilful misconduct or gross negligence, the employer must prove not only the damage incurred, but also that this is attributable to the employee's wilful act or gross negligence, as interpreted by the courts.

NIMASA introduces new compliance strategy for cabotage
Akabogu & Associates
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Nigeria
  • 24 April 2019

The Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) recently issued a marine notice to further the Cabotage Act's objectives and to ensure strict compliance. It is expected that this notice would, among other things, ensure greater compliance with the cabotage regime and drive wider indigenous participation in offshore marine operations. However, as the NIMASA has not introduced a fine or other punishment for non-compliance, full compliance with the notice cannot be guaranteed.

The art of war: keeping and attracting talent in disrupted labour markets
  • Employment & Benefits
  • International
  • 24 April 2019

There are several steps that employers can take to mitigate the risk of their employees leaving to join a competitor. Many employers already offer incentive-based remuneration packages which aim to align their longer-term interests with those of their employees. While such long-term incentive plans, together with a clear communication strategy, can assist with retention, employers should actively consider additional measures.

Supreme Court rules on whether special allowances constitute basic wages for purposes of PF contributions
Shardul Amarchand Mangaldas & Co
  • Employment & Benefits
  • India
  • 24 April 2019

The Supreme Court recently examined whether certain components of an employee's overall salary are subject to provident fund (PF) contributions. As the Supreme Court has clarified that special allowances paid to employees must be included in the calculation of PF contributions, employers should review and analyse their current salary structures to determine any increase in PF liabilities.

Takeover Panel: roundup of recent panel statements
Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP
  • Corporate Finance/M&A
  • United Kingdom
  • 24 April 2019

The Takeover Panel recently published a revised version of the Takeover Code to reflect amendments relating to the response statement to its October 2018 consultation on asset valuations and the Financial Conduct Authority's announcement that it will phase out the United Kingdom Listing Authority name. In addition, the panel recently published a rule-making instrument concerning the response statement to its consultation on the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union.

Final regulations addressing public release of clinical information now in force
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 24 April 2019

The final Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations and Regulations Amending the Medical Devices Regulations recently came into force. Their objective is to provide public access to clinical information submitted to Health Canada for drugs for human use and medical device applications. As a result of the regulations, Health Canada published (among other things) a guidance document to help explain aspects of the new regulations, such as the procedures to prepare information for release.

Supreme Court to decide availability of punitive damages for seafarer's unseaworthiness claim
Wilson Elser
  • Shipping & Transport
  • USA
  • 24 April 2019

The Supreme Court will soon decide whether a Jones Act seafarer can recover punitive damages in a personal injury suit based on a vessel's unseaworthiness. The court recently heard oral arguments in The Dutra Group v Batterton, which has teed up the issue that will resolve a split among the circuit courts and provide clarity on the availability of punitive damages for seafarers in general maritime law causes of action. It is unclear how the court will rule on this long-contested issue.

Third Circuit finds individual ownership interest in corporation not required for False Claims Act liability
Sidley Austin LLP
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • USA
  • 24 April 2019

The Third Circuit recently affirmed and vacated in part a district court ruling granting the United States' motion for summary judgment. The case raised, among other things, the issue of whether an individual without any ownership interests in a company can face False Claims Act liability for the company's failure to perform a required act to qualify for reimbursement and whether an unsworn statement is sufficient to create a material issue of fact when weighed against facts admitted during a plea colloquy.

Time may not be of the essence when considering specific performance
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 23 April 2019

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently outlined when specific performance will be available in a real estate transaction. This decision is a stark reminder of the pitfalls of acting both in bad faith and without diligence in respect of such a transaction. It is also a reminder that a party to an agreement of purchase and sale cannot insist that time is of the essence if (among other things) it breaches the agreement and does not act in good faith.

Periodic payment orders in catastrophic injury cases
Matheson
  • Insurance
  • Ireland
  • 23 April 2019

A recently signed ministerial order marks the formal introduction of long-awaited periodic payment orders (PPOs) in Ireland. This should be a welcome development for insurers as it will avoid upfront compensation payments in catastrophic injury cases. It will also align the Irish regime of awards in case of catastrophic injury with the UK system, under which PPOs are already available.

Duty of care can exist between parent company and third parties affected by subsidiaries' actions
RPC
  • Litigation
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 April 2019

A recent Supreme Court decision concerned a mass tort claim and the potential liability of an English parent company for the actions of its foreign subsidiaries. The court found that a duty of care can exist between a parent company and third parties affected by the actions of its subsidiaries, but was reluctant to place limits on the types of case where a parent company might incur a duty of care.

SEC announces settlements resulting from Share Class Selection Disclosure Initiative
Morrison & Foerster LLP
  • Capital Markets
  • USA
  • 23 April 2019

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) recently announced settlements with 79 investment advisers who self-reported violations of the Investment Advisers Act in connection with the SEC Division of Enforcement Share Class Selection Disclosure Initiative. The advisers collectively agreed to return more than $125 million in fees and prejudgment interest to clients.

Legislature introduces possibility to claim mass damages in collective action proceedings
AKD The Netherlands
  • Litigation
  • Netherlands
  • 23 April 2019

The Senate recently adopted the Bill on Redress of Mass Damages in Collective Actions (RMDCA). The RMDCA enables representative entities to claim monetary compensation on behalf of their constituents, which provides aggrieved parties with more effective means of redress. The RMDCA also introduces stricter requirements regarding the admissibility of representative entities and the scope of collective action proceedings, along with other procedural changes.

Courts confirm basis for indemnity costs
RPC
  • Litigation
  • Hong Kong
  • 23 April 2019

A couple of recent first-instance decisions demonstrate the courts' wide discretion to award costs between parties based on a higher rate of recovery (referred to as an 'indemnity basis'). Such costs are not literally an indemnity – the receiving party does not recover all of their costs from the paying party. While indemnity costs are not the norm, many parties and their legal representatives often seek such costs without sufficient regard to whether this is actually justified.

Defender v HSBC: impact of settling with one concurrent wrongdoer
Matheson
  • Litigation
  • Ireland
  • 23 April 2019

Defender v HSBC highlights the need for plaintiffs to understand the blameworthiness of all wrongdoers before settling a claim against any of them. This case concerned Defender, a fund which invested with Bernard Madoff and subsequently suffered a loss when Madoff was revealed to be operating the world's largest Ponzi scheme.

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