Latest updates

Fragmentation of activity may preclude service provision change
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 September 2018

The Employment Appeal Tribunal has confirmed that when considering whether there has been a service provision change under the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations, a tribunal must identify the relevant activity. Further, the analysis must be conducted in the right order and any fragmentation should be considered when determining whether activities carried on by the subsequent service provider are fundamentally the same as those carried on by the outgoing service provider.

Supreme Court rules on calculation of overtime pay
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 26 September 2018

The Supreme Court recently issued a number of decisions setting out how to calculate overtime pay and how employees can prove any overtime owed when required. Among other things, the decisions state that signed payslips can be used as material evidence. Further, where an employee has not signed a payslip and overtime payments have been made via bank transfer, the employee must prove that they worked the disputed overtime with documentary evidence.

Private M&A trends: earn-outs
Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP
  • Corporate Finance/M&A
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 September 2018

It is not always possible for a buyer to meet a seller's valuation, especially where the seller is seeking upfront value for expected rather than actual revenue or profit. In these circumstances, the buyer and seller may attempt to bridge the gap and agree the terms of an earn-out. Under a typical earn-out structure for a private M&A transaction, the buyer will make an initial payment of consideration at completion and one or more deferred contingent payments over a specified period following completion.

New draft law mandates additional passive safety equipment
Kincaid | Mendes Vianna Advogados
  • Shipping & Transport
  • Brazil
  • 26 September 2018

Two members of Parliament recently presented a draft law that would mandate the installation of additional passive safety equipment for new boat engines and factory outlets. The draft law builds on previous legislation which sought to reduce the large number of serious accidents between vessels and the North Region's riverside inhabitants. Legislators await a congressional order to define the committees that will analyse the draft law and its procedural arrangements.

Industrial Relations Board renders first decision on concept of 'artist'
Fasken
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Canada
  • 26 September 2018

The Canada Industrial Relations Board has examined for the first time how the concept of an 'independent contractor' should be applied when determining the status of an 'artist' under the Status of the Artist Act. The board also examined the intended scope of a universal bargaining unit and confirmed that this may vary depending on the context. The decision has opened the door to a more contextual interpretation of an 'independent contractor' in certain circumstances.

New collective bargaining agreement for bank employees
Castegnaro
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Luxembourg
  • 26 September 2018

The Luxembourg Bankers' Association recently signed the new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) for Bank Employees 2018-2020 with the Luxembourg Association of Bank and Insurance Employees and the trade unions representative of the financial sector. Given the number of changes and their level of impact, the CBA will be introduced gradually over the next three years.

Supreme Court rules on different working conditions for employees rehired after reaching retirement age
Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Japan
  • 26 September 2018

One of the controversial issues regarding Japan's so-called 'lifetime employment system' is whether and to what extent employers can impose different working conditions (eg, salaries, bonuses and allowances) when they rehire employees who were once non-fixed-term employees as fixed-term employees. The Supreme Court recently handed down a significant decision addressing this issue.

New rating guidelines, same rules
Hogan Lovells BSTL SC
  • Telecoms
  • Mexico
  • 26 September 2018

The Ministry of the Interior recently issued the Guidelines for the Audiovisual Content Classification of Broadcasting Transmissions and Pay Television and Audio Services. The 2015 guidelines dramatically increased the hours during which a programme or ad can be broadcast depending on its rating, leading to legal disputes to protect child audiences. While the 2018 guidelines maintain the same broadcast times as the 2015 guidelines, they have increased the duration of the parental warning.

How will VERBIS affect pharmaceutical companies?
Fırat Izgi Attorney Partnership
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Turkey
  • 26 September 2018

The Personal Data Protection Authority recently announced that data controllers which employ fewer than 50 employees, have an annual turnover of less than TRY25 million and process no special categories of personal data as their main field of activity will be exempt from registering with the new Data Controller Registry (VERBIS). However, it remains to be seen how the authority will interpret the 'main field of activity' of pharmaceutical companies and how this will affect their obligations for registering with VERBIS.

Health Canada news: September 2018
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 26 September 2018

There have been a number of recent Health Canada developments. For example, in June 2018 the Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare was launched, together with the release of a discussion paper and the opening of a public consultation. In addition, Health Canada recently published notice of revised guidance documents on post-notice of compliance changes and its Drug and Medical Device Highlights 2017 report.

Tobacco companies cannot compel production of health records
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Healthcare & Life Sciences
  • Canada
  • 26 September 2018

The province of British Columbia recently brought an action against Philip Morris International and other tobacco manufacturers to recover healthcare costs relating to the treatment of diseases caused or contributed to by exposure to a tobacco product pursuant to the Tobacco Damages and Healthcare Costs Recovery Act. The Supreme Court of Canada held that British Columbia could not be compelled to produce a collection of anonymised healthcare databases that it intended to use to prove causation and damage.

Supreme Court moves towards recognising employees' rights to reduce working hours for childcare purposes
CMS Albiñana & Suárez de Lezo
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Spain
  • 26 September 2018

The employment courts recently expanded the scope of the rights and privileges granted to employees who exercise their right to request a reduction of their working hours, including to take care of a child under 12 years old. A recent Supreme Court decision represents another step forward in recognising these rights when employees are dismissed and the dismissal is declared null and void by an employment court.

Alberta Court of Appeal clarifies what the Crown must prove in a general duty offence
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 25 September 2018

The Alberta Court of Appeal recently provided clarity on what the Crown must prove in a prosecution under the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Act regarding the failure to ensure the health and safety of workers. The key question before the court was whether the expression "as far as is reasonably practicable for the employer to do so" in the general duty section of the act was part of the physical components of the offence that the Crown had to prove.

Life imprisonment and whole-life imprisonment – a history of Cypriot case law
Elias Neocleous & Co LLC
  • Litigation
  • Cyprus
  • 25 September 2018

Life imprisonment generally does not constitute a whole-life sentence because the prisoner will, in most cases, be eligible for early release after a fixed period set by the court. In exceptionally grave cases, the court may order that life should mean life and that the prisoner should remain incarcerated for the rest of their life. The case of Panagiotis Kafkaris was considered sufficiently serious to merit a whole-life sentence and his release marks the end of a landmark case on this issue in Cyprus.

Insurers' contractual obligations in case of fraudulent claims
BADERTSCHER Rechtsanwälte AG
  • Insurance
  • Switzerland
  • 25 September 2018

Under the Insurance Contract Act, insurers are not bound by a contract if, for deception purposes, the insured party incorrectly notifies or conceals facts from the insurer which would exclude or reduce the insurer's obligation to provide indemnification. Insurers can therefore refuse payment and withdraw from such contracts. The Federal Supreme Court recently confirmed this to be true even if an insured party does not make false statements directly to the insurer, but rather to a medical doctor who confirms their inability to work.

DPA's strict view on retention periods
Schoenherr Attorneys at Law
  • IT & Internet
  • Austria
  • 25 September 2018

The Austrian Data Protection Authority (DPA) recently published its first decision on retention periods following the enactment of the General Data Protection Regulation. The decision is final. The DPA had to decide how long a telecoms service provider must retain so-called 'master data' – that is, data required for the controller's legal relationship with the users of its services.

Lower threshold for staying proceedings pending appeal
Gan Partnership
  • Litigation
  • Malaysia
  • 25 September 2018

Following a recent Court of Appeal decision on staying proceedings pending appeal, the test as to whether a stay ought to be granted under Section 44 of the Courts of Judicature Act has been simplified (ie, it now focuses on whether the true purpose of the stay is to preserve the integrity of the appeal). The new threshold to obtain a stay is considerably lower than that of the special circumstances rule under Section 73 of the Courts of Judicature Act.

New law on court enforcement of European account preservation orders
Luther SA
  • Litigation
  • Luxembourg
  • 25 September 2018

The EU European Account Preservation Orders (EAPO) Regulation states that attachment orders must be enforced through the courts in accordance with the procedures applicable to the enforcement of equivalent national orders in the member state of enforcement. As Luxembourg's existing legislation proved to be poorly adapted to the execution of EAPOs, it recently implemented the EAPO Conversion Law in order to introduce a specific court enforcement procedure applicable only to EAPOs.

High Court warns directors to get match fit for new reporting regulations
RPC
  • Litigation
  • United Kingdom
  • 25 September 2018

It is understandable that directors might be reluctant to seek legal advice – be it due to concern about time or cost or a potential conflict of interest if seeking advice internally. However, as a recent case demonstrates, this is a small price to pay to avoid the time and financial cost of a claim, especially when a company's subsequent precarious financial position shines a light on an officer's behaviour and competence.

Heks'nkaas: advocate general's opinion on copyrighting tastes unpalatable for Levola
AKD NV
  • Litigation
  • Netherlands
  • 25 September 2018

In May 2017 the Arnhem-Leeuwarden Appellate Court referred questions regarding which kinds of object can be classified as copyrightable works to the European Court of Justice (ECJ). The case addresses the interesting question of whether certain tastes can be protected under copyright law (the specific taste for which protection was sought was Levola's popular cheese product Heks'nkaas). Advocate General Wathelet recently advised the ECJ not to allow tastes to be granted copyright protection.

Current search

Refine search

Type

Work area

Jurisdiction

Firm