Latest updates

COVID-19 Weekly Report (4-10 May 2020)
International Law Office
  • International
  • 11 May 2020

The impact of COVID-19 is being felt in almost every work area across the globe. In order to keep readers abreast of this evolving situation, ILO's COVID-19 Weekly Report provides insight into the major legal developments of the past seven days, as well as a round-up of our panel of experienced international legal commentators' legislative and regulatory guidance.

Is my business automatically protected against creditors during COVID-19 crisis?
ALTIUS
  • Belgium
  • 08 May 2020

Due to the lockdown measures and other restrictions imposed by the government to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, many companies are dealing with revenue losses while having the same level of (fixed) costs. Royal Decree No 15, which recently entered into force, implements new temporary measures to protect businesses that had not ceased payment before or on 18 March 2020 but found themselves in difficulty afterwards due to the COVID-19 crisis. These measures will last until 17 May 2020, unless extended.

COVID-19 Weekly Report (20-26 April 2020)
International Law Office
  • International
  • 27 April 2020

The impact of COVID-19 is being felt in almost every work area across the globe. In order to keep readers abreast of this evolving situation, ILO's COVID-19 Weekly Report provides insight into the major legal developments of the past seven days, as well as a round-up of our panel of experienced international legal commentators' legislative and regulatory guidance.

COVID-19 pandemic prompts changes to rules applicable to distressed companies
Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP
  • France
  • 24 April 2020

The government has taken a number of emergency measures on bankruptcy and insolvency proceedings as part of its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. These measures apply during the duration of the so-called 'health emergency', plus one or three months, depending on the case. This article considers the impact of the emergency measures on bankruptcy and insolvency proceedings in France.

Examinership: protecting businesses during and after COVID-19 pandemic
AG Erotocritou LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 24 April 2020

Although it is a relatively unknown procedure, examinership may hold the key to the survival of businesses dealing with the financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. Examinership can protect a business from any claims advanced against it in the short term and offer assistance in the form of an insolvency practitioner, who can devise a restructuring plan to safeguard the business's long-term survival.

Court of Appeal validates test under Section 99 of Companies Law
Ogier
  • Cayman Islands
  • 17 April 2020

The Court of Appeal has provided much needed clarification of the test for validating certain transactions by companies that are subject to a winding-up petition, pursuant to Section 99 of the Companies Law (2020 Revision). Section 99 operates to help maintain the status quo of a company at the date of a winding-up petition so that the winding-up petition can continue to achieve its purposes.

COVID-19 Weekly Report (23-30 March 2020)
International Law Office
  • International
  • 03 April 2020

The impact of COVID-19 is being felt in almost every work area across the globe. In order to keep readers abreast of this evolving situation, ILO's COVID-19 Weekly Report provides insight into the major legal developments of the past seven days, as well as a round-up of our panel of expert international legal commentators' legislative and regulatory guidance.

COVID-19: considerations for businesses, directors and lenders
  • International
  • 27 March 2020

The coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to create an evolving list of challenges. However, while the health and economic impact of the outbreak is being felt worldwide, companies and their directors can take proactive steps to combat its negative effects, particularly in the insolvency area. This article looks at the potential impact of COVID-19 on businesses and examines what stakeholders and directors can do to recognise, manage and mitigate potential insolvency risks.

Obtaining attachment on cryptocurrencies in Switzerland
Pestalozzi Attorneys at Law
  • Switzerland
  • 13 March 2020

The general view in Switzerland is that cryptocurrencies are intangible assets sui generis and as such can be subject to regular debt enforcement and insolvency proceedings in Switzerland (provided that these cryptocurrencies have a financial value). This article highlights the particularities to be considered when cryptocurrencies are the target of an attachment procedure (ie, a freezing order) in Switzerland.

Winding-up petitions: locus standi for oppressed minority shareholders
AG Erotocritou LLC
  • Cyprus
  • 06 March 2020

The Limassol District Court recently ruled that minority shareholders may file an oppression of minority petition irrespective of whether the underlying company had a positive value for making distributions to shareholders in the event of a winding up. Although this first-instance judgment carries no precedential value, it nevertheless sets the record straight with regard to petitioners' locus standi to promote oppression of minority petitions in the event of a winding up.

Limits to privileged claims
ALTIUS
  • Belgium
  • 28 February 2020

A Supreme Court judgment has clarified that new financing during reorganisation proceedings in principle results in new claims, leading to a privileged status of such claims in the framework of any subsequent liquidation. Further, it confirms that the courts require financing to be actual and new (ie, mere refinancing is insufficient).

2020 heralds insolvency law changes
Ogier
  • Guernsey
  • 07 February 2020

The States of Guernsey recently passed the Companies (Guernsey) Law 2008 (Insolvency) (Amendment) Ordinance 2020, making Guernsey an even more desirable forum for insolvency proceedings. The changes show that Guernsey is prepared to arm insolvency office holders with the necessary tools and powers to tackle, draw in and preserve the assets of an insolvent company for the benefit of creditors.

Compatibility of liquidation and adjudication
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 07 February 2020

Generally speaking, the purpose of adjudication is to speed up cash flow and allow the speedy resolution of disputes, while the purpose of liquidation is to resolve the final accounting position between two parties in respect of all of their dealings. As a result, there are often incompatibilities between the two regimes. A recent Technology and Construction Court decision provides the latest judicial guidance on the ability of a company in liquidation to refer a dispute to adjudication.

Potential cryptocurrency issues in insolvency and restructuring sphere
Oon & Bazul LLP
  • Singapore
  • 07 February 2020

Otonomos BCC Pte Ltd is one of the first technology companies specialising in blockchain technology to be wound up by the Singapore courts. As there are likely to be more insolvency and restructuring cases dealing with cryptocurrency in the near future, this article examines the legal nature of cryptocurrency in the insolvency and restructuring sphere, the feasibility of using cryptocurrency as security and the potential challenges faced by insolvency practitioners relating to cryptocurrency.

Company voluntary arrangements: secured creditors' (almost) impenetrable rights
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 January 2020

High-profile use of company voluntary arrangements (CVAs) has led to widespread media coverage and controversies. Household names such as Jamie's Italian, Prezzo, Toys R Us, Mothercare, Gourmet Burger Kitchen and more recently Debenhams are among the growing list of companies that have followed this well-trodden path, with varying degrees of success. This article briefly covers the CVA process, analyses Debenhams' recent High Court appeal and discusses the impact of CVAs on lenders.

Clawback: chasing assets
ALTIUS
  • Belgium
  • 13 December 2019

The legal form of the actio pauliana offers options for creditors which are confronted with debtors that are disposing of important assets or organising their insolvency. This article reflects on some of the options offered under Belgian law by the actio pauliana, commonly referred to in English as the 'clawback' rules.

Legal qualification of cryptocurrencies under Swiss insolvency law
Pestalozzi Attorneys at Law
  • Switzerland
  • 01 November 2019

The recent insolvency of German-Swiss cryptocurrency mining venture Envion AG inevitably begs the question of how cryptocurrencies should be treated in debt enforcement and insolvency proceedings. Further, the fact that cryptocurrencies have a number of particularities which distinguish them from other asset categories raises numerous questions relating to (for example) the seizure, attachment and liquidation of cryptocurrencies from a Swiss insolvency law perspective.

Effect of EU preventive restructuring directive on Belgian insolvency framework
ALTIUS
  • Belgium
  • 18 October 2019

A number of legislative changes to Book XX of the Code of Economic Law may be required following the adoption of EU Directive 2019/1023/EU on preventive restructuring frameworks. This article focuses on the directive's potential effect on Book XX with regard to debtors in possession, the duration of moratoria, the suspension of enforcement during moratoria, the suspension and termination of ongoing contracts, the cramdown of creditors and the acceptance of reorganisation plans.

Liability of administrators for economic loss of a creditor
Taylor Wessing
  • United Kingdom
  • 06 September 2019

In a recent ruling, the Court of Appeal confirmed that administrators owe a duty to all creditors and cannot be held personally liable for the economic loss of a creditor where no special relationship exists. In coming to its decision, the court showed a willingness to look at the commercial realities of the decisions that administrators must make on a daily basis.

Privy Council determines extraterritorial reach of clawback claims in insolvency proceedings
Lennox Paton
  • Bahamas
  • 23 August 2019

The Privy Council has determined that, notwithstanding the absence of express statutory provisions permitting service out of the jurisdiction of fraudulent preference claims, such claims are to have extraterritorial effect. This decision clarifies the law as it relates to the extraterritorial effect of fraudulent preference claims; however, it also creates difficulties for subscribers to mutual funds that may be held liable for investments made on behalf of third-party beneficiaries that are the ultimate recipients of payments.

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