Mexico updates

Insurance

Contributed by Hogan Lovells BSTL SC
CNSF sets out requirements for fintech ventures in insurance industry
  • Mexico
  • 28 May 2019

The National Insurance and Bonding Commission recently amended the Sole Insurance and Bonding Rules to include the process for securing a temporary authorisation to operate as a regulated company in the insurance sector using 'technologically novel models' (ie, tools or technological media that do not exist in the market and help in the rendering of financial services). This process aims to allow start-ups to offer and test novel models without having to fully comply with the applicable legal framework.

Civil liability insurance made mandatory for all motor vehicles
  • Mexico
  • 22 January 2019

In 2014 the federal government announced that civil liability insurance would be required for motor vehicle owners who travel on federal roads, avenues and bridges in order to guarantee third parties relief for any damages caused to themselves and their property. This measure was gradually rolled out under the Law of Federal Roads, Bridges and Transportation and, as of 1 January 2019, now applies to all motor vehicles.

Insurers' and bonding companies' obligations regarding sensitive user information amended
  • Mexico
  • 02 October 2018

The National Insurance and Bonds Commission recently amended the Sole Provisions on Insurance and Bonds, removing the obligation for insurers and bonding companies to inform the commission when their users' sensitive information is altered, extracted, lost, deleted or suspected of having been accessed without authorisation or compromised. Now, insurers and bonding companies must immediately conduct an investigation and notify affected users of a data breach within three working days.

New government to eliminate private medical insurance for public officials
  • Mexico
  • 18 September 2018

The recently elected government administration has publicly announced that it intends to eliminate the private medical insurance currently granted to public officials as part of their benefits. This measure aims to encourage public officials to use state medical services and reduce government expenditure. If the cancellation of this benefit is confirmed, a significant number of officials are likely to seek major medical expenses insurance, which will present an opportunity for various companies in the sector.

Amendment to Insurance Law mandates insurers to offer products for disabilities
  • Mexico
  • 14 August 2018

A recent amendment to the Insurance Law has mandated medical expenses insurers to offer insurance products that cover risks which can cause disabilities in individuals. The amendment decree also revised the General Law for the Inclusion of Disabled Individuals, which prohibits any type of discrimination against individuals with any type of disability.


Intellectual Property

Contributed by Becerril Coca & Becerril SC
Plant inventions and patent eligibility trends
  • Mexico
  • 16 September 2019

The Mexican Institute of Industrial Property's examination criteria was previously consistent enough to provide patent applicants with legal certainty about the eligibility of plant-related inventions. However, recent changes to the criteria for these kinds of invention have resulted in uncertainty which may affect even the validity of already granted patents.

Intellectual property and public policy
  • Mexico
  • 09 September 2019

The National Development Plan 2019-2024 (NDP) was recently published, just a few days before the release of the Global Innovation Index. Unlike the previous version, the new NDP does not expressly mention patents or intellectual property. This is not a good sign for a knowledge-based economy ranked first in the world for creative goods exports.

Senate ratifies USMCA: overview of IP chapter
  • Mexico
  • 24 June 2019

Mexico recently became the first country to ratify the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), Chapter 20 of which is one of the most comprehensive IP chapters in any trade agreement. Although the 2018 amendments to Mexico's IP laws provided for most of the specific rights required under the USMCA, the country still has a lot to do to provide for the obligations regarding geographical indications, data exclusivity, trade secrets and enforcement.

Change to IMPI's letters patent practice
  • Mexico
  • 03 June 2019

In 2018 the rules for notifying the issuance of a patent, utility model or industrial design application were amended. Thus, all notices issued by the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property (IMPI) must be published via the Official Gazette. In a broad interpretation of this reform, the IMPI now provides only digital copies of letters patent and utility model and industrial design registrations. While this interpretation may be inaccurate, it aligns with the global trend of digitalisation among IP offices.

Applicants beware! IMPI's new notification procedure is a trap
  • Mexico
  • 27 May 2019

The 2018 changes to the Mexican patent system are not looking promising for patent prosecution. By way of the amendments, the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property has implemented a new system whereby it will issue official communications to applicants through its Official Gazette instead of personally or by certified mail. Applicants should exercise extreme caution in order to avoid a loss of rights due to a failure to monitor and identify issued office actions.


Product Regulation & Liability

Recent changes to cannabis legal landscape
Sanchez DeVanny Eseverri SC
  • Mexico
  • 29 November 2018

A number of changes to the cannabis legal landscape have taken place in Mexico over the past few weeks. For example, the Federal Commission for the Protection against Sanitary Risk recently published on its website guidelines on the sanitary control of cannabis and cannabis derivatives. Further, the Supreme Court issued its fifth decision granting constitutional protection against the adult use prohibition and Congress was presented with a bill to implement the General Law for Cannabis Control.

Tobacco products: what constitutes a crime?
Sanchez DeVanny Eseverri SC
  • Mexico
  • 05 July 2018

The Secretariat of Health recently announced amendments to the General Law on Tobacco Control. The new Title Eight includes Articles 56 and 57, which specifically address crimes relating to tobacco products. The new provisions are particularly relevant for individuals and legal entities engaged in the tobacco industry. Industry players are advised to consider the scope of these amendments and determine how their business operations in Mexico may be affected.

New regulations govern use of marijuana for health and industrial reasons
Sanchez DeVanny Eseverri SC
  • Mexico
  • 05 April 2018

New legal provisions regarding the use of marijuana for medical and industrial purposes were recently published in the Federal Official Gazette and have sparked great interest in the potential development of such products in Mexico. However, the proposed regulations could contravene other federal laws, regulations and standards which explicitly state that marijuana and its derivatives cannot be used as ingredients or raw materials for food, beverages, cosmetics and other products bound for human consumption.


Real Estate

Tourism real estate: legal considerations for developers
  • Mexico
  • 12 April 2019

Mexico attracts a large number of tourists, and real estate to support this booming industry is frequently being developed by investors. As Mexico has an abundance of natural resources, tourism developments often take place in a range of different ecosystems, such as forests, beaches and jungles. This article examines the main legal issues that developers should consider when planning a real estate project in Mexico.

Maximising your real estate returns with fractional ownership
  • Mexico
  • 22 February 2019

As with any other type of investment opportunity, when investing in real estate, it is crucial to limit the risks as much as possible while maintaining maximum returns. Fractional ownership is a good option in this regard, irrespective of whether a party wants to develop real estate or invest in personal real property. Often mistakenly compared with the timeshare model, the fractional ownership model has unique characteristics which can make investing in real estate more feasible and manageable.

Title insurance and indigenous rights
  • Mexico
  • 02 November 2018

Procuring title insurance has become common practice in real estate transactions for both lenders and owners. As title insurance is a type of indemnity insurance which covers financial loss from title defects, it protects policyholders from past events which could affect the property's transfer. However, certain aspects of real estate development which are unique to Mexico must be taken into account in this regard.

Prior consultation with indigenous communities: key requirement for real estate developers
  • Mexico
  • 31 August 2018

Convention 169 – Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention establishes that indigenous peoples or communities must be consulted on any legislative or administrative act that may directly affect them. Companies that intend to develop or invest in real estate projects in Mexico should therefore consider community consultation as part of their feasibility criteria.

How to acquire real estate in Mexico: alternate investment vehicles
  • Mexico
  • 20 July 2018

Acquiring real estate in Mexico can be cumbersome and time consuming, particularly for foreign investors. The Constitution forbids foreign individuals and entities from holding direct ownership of land or waters in the geographic area known as the 'restricted zone'. However, Mexican law allows foreign individuals and entities to use a foreign trust to acquire beneficial interests in real estate that is located in the restricted zone where it is intended to be used for residential or commercial purposes.


Tech, Data, Telecoms & Media

Contributed by Hogan Lovells BSTL SC
Cybersecurity (or lack thereof) under new administration
  • Mexico
  • 02 August 2019

The administration recently issued its National Development Plan 2019-2024, which – despite the previous administration's plans – does not mention cybersecurity. Although there are still hopes that cybersecurity will be addressed in the soon-to-be-released Communications and Transports Sectorial Programme 2019-2024, it appears that the present administration has no intention of implementing a cybersecurity strategy.

Internet for everyone?
  • Mexico
  • 07 June 2019

The Federal Electricity Commission recently published draft terms of reference for a new tender procedure in which 50,000km of two strands of dark fibre will be allocated for the provision of free internet services to all citizens under the so-called 'Internet for All' project. Specialist opinions on the project's feasibility have been mixed, and the president has stated that if no winner is published in the near future, he will create a government agency to provide internet services throughout the country.

Excessive fines deemed unconstitutional in landmark Supreme Court of Justice declaration
  • Mexico
  • 22 March 2019

The Supreme Court of Justice recently declared that an article of the Federal Telecommunications and Broadcasting Law – which provided that the minimum fine for any violation of the law not otherwise expressly penalised in another law was 1% of the offender's annual income – to be unconstitutional. This declaration may signal that the court intends to participate more regularly in shaping Mexico's legal framework in order to rectify deficiencies created by Congress.

IFT files constitutional challenge against budget cuts
  • Mexico
  • 01 February 2019

One of the first actions that the new federal government administration undertook after taking office in December 2018 was to prepare the expenses budget in accordance with the new president's austerity principles. After heated discussions, the budget was finally approved on 24 December 2018. Shortly after, the Federal Telecommunications Institute filed a constitutional challenge in which it claimed that the budget will affect its ability to perform its constitutional regulatory functions.

IFT fully liberates 600MHz band
  • Mexico
  • 21 December 2018

Mexico recently became the first country to liberate the 600MHz band after the Federal Telecommunications Institute approved the relocation of the last two channels that transmitted therein in order to free it up for 5G broadband services. This transition will enable Mexico to make the band available to the market through a bidding process and exploit international mobile telecoms applications for 5G mobile broadband services.