Latest updates

Digitalisation and codetermination: Facebook, Google Maps... and now Twitter
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Germany
  • 13 March 2019

After the sensational Facebook ruling rendered by the Federal Labour Court in 2016, the discrepancy between rapid digitalisation and restrictive case law with regard to Section 87(I)(6) of the Works Constitution Act has once again become the focus of attention in a labour law dispute. The Hamburg Regional Labour Court recently addressed the question of whether a Twitter account maintained by an employer constitutes a technical device that is intended to monitor employees' performance and conduct.

Potential risks of courier-delivered dismissal notices
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Germany
  • 19 December 2018

To ensure that serving a dismissal notice will withstand a court's scrutiny, it should be handed to the employee in person and the employee should countersign a duplicate. However, if the dismissal notice is served by an external courier, the employer may have to comply with different data protection requirements to avoid breaching data protection law.

New maximum hiring out period expires for some contractors
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Germany
  • 17 October 2018

In view of a statutory transition clause in the Temporary Employment Act, for some deployment agencies the 18-month maximum hiring out period will end shortly – for external employees deployed as of 1 April 2017, the expiry date could have been the end of September 2018. To avoid all possible risk of overstepping the maximum hiring out period, personnel services providers and companies using such providers are advised to determine precisely what they consider the expiration date to be.

Criminal penalties for tax fraud cannot apply to breach of trust allegations
  • White Collar Crime
  • Germany
  • 24 September 2018

According to the Federal Court of Justice's established case law, the penalty for tax evasion of more than €1 million should generally be imprisonment rather than a suspended sentence. However, the court recently ruled that these principles cannot apply to breach of trust allegations. The decision has significant implications for white collar crime and compliance.

Seizure of documents relating to internal investigations – legislative changes ahead?
  • White Collar Crime
  • Germany
  • 03 September 2018

A recent Federal Constitutional Court decision has clarified whether documents relating to internal investigations can be regarded as defence documents. Against the hope of companies and law firms, the court rejected the general prohibition on the seizure of such documents; however, it indicated that such a prohibition should always be determined on a case-by-case basis.

Selective distribution: legality of third-party platform bans confirmed
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Germany
  • 26 July 2018

The Frankfurt Higher Regional Court recently implemented the European Court of Justice's (ECJ's) sailing instruction and decided in favour of the luxury cosmetics manufacturer Coty on third-party platform bans in selective distribution. The judgment comes after the ECJ – in an abstract manner – declared third-party platform bans in the selective distribution of luxury goods permissible under competition law.

Fixed-term employment contracts: three-year limit for prohibiting prior employment overturned
  • Employment & Immigration
  • Germany
  • 25 July 2018

The Federal Constitutional Court recently restricted the option of concluding fixed-term employment contracts without an objective reason with applicants who have previously worked for the employer. The court also recognised that an unlimited prohibition on prior employment can unreasonably restrict the option of fixed-term contracts without objective reason. This ruling has consequences for current fixed-term contracts and for future hiring practice.

Federal Court of Justice resolves dispute on limitation periods in cartel damages claims
  • Competition & Antitrust
  • Germany
  • 28 June 2018

Litigants may now seek cartel damages for a longer period as the Federal Court of Justice has affirmed the suspension of the statute of limitations for antitrust claims before 1 July 2005. The court's judgment creates legal certainty and increases Germany's attractiveness as a jurisdiction for plaintiffs in cartel damages cases. It is also a major setback for defendants in cases concerning cement, truck and sugar cartels (among others), which will face even bigger damages claims.

Corporate penalties and internal investigations
  • White Collar Crime
  • Germany
  • 18 June 2018

The federal government plans to create new corporate penalties and abandon the discretionary principle which has thus far applied in corporate prosecutions. Further, the upper limit of penalties will be significantly increased. At the same time, the government aims to establish legal requirements for internal investigations that provide an incentive for investigation support.