Latest updates

No separate claim for interest needed when increasing value of claim in dispute
Gün + Partners
  • Litigation
  • Turkey
  • 24 March 2020

In a May 2019 decision, the Supreme Court General Assembly on the Unification of Judgments concluded that the plaintiff in a partial monetary action need not reiterate its claim for interest when increasing the value of the claim if it claimed interest for its principal receivables in the plaint petition and the claim of interest will automatically apply for the amount which is increased later on.

What does labour law say about COVID-19?
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 18 March 2020

The coronavirus pandemic will inevitably affect Turkish labour law; as part of employers' duty to protect employees, they must take occupational health and safety measures and protect employees' health and physical and mental integrity. This article outlines employers' duties in this respect.

Anti-corruption, compliance enforcement and legislative developments in 2019
  • White Collar Crime
  • Turkey
  • 10 February 2020

The year 2019 was a busy one for Turkey with regard to anti-corruption and compliance matters. This article explores the developments from both a national and an international perspective. Among other things, the European Commission published its Turkey 2019 Report, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development stated that it would establish a centre in Istanbul and Turkey introduced two new trial procedures to the criminal justice system.

Changes to minimum wage, severance payments and administrative fines
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 05 February 2020

At the beginning of each year, the minimum wage, severance payments and administrative fines prescribed by the Labour Act are revised. On 1 January 2020 the changes for 2020 came into effect. Among other changes, the monthly minimum wage rate has increased from TL2,558.40 (gross) to TL2,943.00 (gross).

Supreme Court revokes its decision on service date of electronic notifications
Gün + Partners
  • Litigation
  • Turkey
  • 04 February 2020

The Supreme Court recently examined the date on which an addressee had viewed an electronic notification. The court's first decision caused uncertainty as it accepted the date on which the notification had been viewed as the notification date. However, the court later revoked this decision and provided clear legal guidance that electronic notifications will be deemed to have been served by the end of the fifth day after their delivery, regardless of whether the addressee has viewed the notification.

Constitutionality of 5% interest rate payment rule under Press Labour Law
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 11 December 2019

The Constitutional Court recently found that the requirement for employers to pay interest at a rate of 5% for each day that a journalist's overtime payments remain outstanding conflicts with the Constitution. The court ruled that this requirement places an excessive burden on employers and may result in journalists' unjustified enrichment. Therefore, the court repealed the provision on the grounds that it breached the principles of proportionality and equality.

Survival of parties' will for penalty clauses in employment contracts
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 13 November 2019

The Supreme Court General Assembly on the Unification of Judgments recently concluded that penalty clauses agreed for the unjust termination of a fixed-term employment contract before its end date are valid and enforceable even if the contract is deemed to be of an indefinite nature due to a lack of objective conditions required by law to conclude fixed-term contracts.

Justification of court decisions – an overview
Gün + Partners
  • Litigation
  • Turkey
  • 23 July 2019

The justification of court decisions is regarded as a key element of the right to a fair trial. In Turkey, this right is protected by the European Convention on Human Rights, as well as the Turkish Constitution, the Code of Civil Procedure and Supreme Court precedents. However, in practice, judgments are sometimes made without providing any justification as to why the parties' claims and evidence were not taken into account.

Mandatory mediation in labour disputes – an overview
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 10 July 2019

Applying for mediation was recently made a prerequisite when filing a lawsuit concerning monetary claims by employees or employers arising out of employment contracts, collective labour agreements or reinstatement claims. Mandatory mediation was introduced to accelerate legal proceedings and lower the costs in employment disputes.

What happens when an unquantified claim is quantifiable?
Gün + Partners
  • Litigation
  • Turkey
  • 04 June 2019

When the new Code of Civil Procedure was enacted in 2011, it introduced a new case type to Turkish litigation where plaintiffs file an action for receivables for an unquantified amount that is left to the courts to determine subject to dispute. This innovation in the litigation procedure raises questions regarding the instances in which plaintiffs should be deemed unable to calculate the size of their claims and what the courts should do when the receivables or damages are quantifiable.

Constitutional Court annuls provision on imprisonment for opposition to interim injunctions
Gün + Partners
  • Litigation
  • Turkey
  • 26 March 2019

Parties that failed to comply with an interim injunction or that violated an injunction previously faced one to six months' imprisonment. However, the Constitutional Court recently annulled this provision due to its lack of clear regulation and legal remedies. The changes will enter into force nine months after their publication in the Official Gazette and are final and binding on legislative, executive and judicial bodies, administrative authorities and real and legal entities.

Supreme Court rules inappropriately worded emails are valid reason for termination
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 06 March 2019

The Supreme Court recently found that the failure of employees to use appropriate language in their written workplace correspondence with superiors or colleagues constitutes a valid reason for termination. The court held that although the actions of the employee in question had not been serious enough to constitute just cause for termination and deprive him of his termination benefits, the employer could not be expected to continue the employment relationship.

Changes to minimum wage, severance payments and administrative fines
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 13 February 2019

Minimum wage, severance payments and administrative fines prescribed by the Labour Act are revised at the beginning of each calendar year. The minimum wage rate was recently increased to TL2,558.40 (gross) and the maximum severance payment was increased to TL6,017.60 (gross). In addition, the rate of administrative fines was increased by 23.73% compared with 2018.

One last step before litigating your commercial receivables: mandatory mediation
Gün + Partners
  • Arbitration & ADR
  • Turkey
  • 07 February 2019

Mandatory mediation for commercial disputes was recently introduced by the Law on Legal Procedures to Initiate Proceedings for Monetary Receivables arising out of Subscription Agreements. As a result, an application for mediation is a condition for bringing a legal action before the courts, and a case will be dismissed on procedural grounds if the claimant in a commercial action fails to fulfil this obligation.

Effects of recently published presidential executive decree on salaries in or indexed to foreign currency
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 21 November 2018

The recently published Presidential Executive Decree 85 amended Decree 32 on the Protection of the Turkish Currency. In the field of employment law, it is unclear whether foreign nationals fall within the scope of the decree and how their salaries will be paid going forward. Since the decree uses the term 'Turkish residents', the general understanding is that it also applies to foreign employees, as they must have a residential address in Turkey in order to have a work permit.

Supreme Court rules on calculation of overtime pay
Gün + Partners
  • Employment & Benefits
  • Turkey
  • 26 September 2018

The Supreme Court recently issued a number of decisions setting out how to calculate overtime pay and how employees can prove any overtime owed when required. Among other things, the decisions state that signed payslips can be used as material evidence. Further, where an employee has not signed a payslip and overtime payments have been made via bank transfer, the employee must prove that they worked the disputed overtime with documentary evidence.

Amendments to collection of electronic evidence procedures
Gün + Partners
  • White Collar Crime
  • Turkey
  • 24 September 2018

Computers, computer programs and records used by suspects are among the most important evidence for public prosecutors who carry out external investigations relating to white collar crime. There is no definition of 'electronic evidence' in Turkey, but Article 134 of the Code of Criminal Procedure sets out the procedure for searching, copying and seizing computers, computer programs and records. An amendment to Article 134 concerning the collection of electronic evidence procedures was recently published.

Supreme Court view on adapting contracts due to fluctuation in currency exchange rates
Gün + Partners
  • Litigation
  • Turkey
  • 04 September 2018

Turkey has recently faced higher currency exchange rates, which has raised the question of whether this increase constitutes a change in circumstances that affects the fulfilment of contractual obligations. As there is no settled Supreme Court precedent regarding whether a fluctuation in currency exchange rates requires the adaptation of contracts, first-instance courts will need to examine the circumstances of each case.

Attorney-client privilege in context of internal investigations
  • White Collar Crime
  • Turkey
  • 06 August 2018

In the absence of any clear guidance with regard to attorney-client privilege and white collar crime, the Competition Board's interpretation is a reference for future disputes and investigations. The board has held that companies subject to an investigation may refrain from disclosing their correspondence with their attorneys (and documents subject to this correspondence) provided that they explain who produced it and its purpose.

Significant amendments to Enforcement and Bankruptcy Law introduced
Gün + Partners
  • Insolvency & Restructuring
  • Turkey
  • 29 June 2018

The Law amending the Enforcement and Bankruptcy Law and Other Laws recently came into force. The most significant amendments introduced to the Enforcement and Bankruptcy Law are the abrogation of the postponement of bankruptcy procedure and the adoption of a more efficient and functional structure for the composition with creditors procedure, which is a court-approved agreement between debtors and creditors.