Latest updates

Court of Appeal maintains interim springboard injunction in team moves case
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 April 2019

A recent Court of Appeal judgment is a helpful reminder of the applicable legal tests in securing an interim springboard injunction. It also identifies several practical factors that may influence the granting of discretionary remedies in the context of a team move and reminds employers facing an injunction application of the risk that the 'truth will out' if they (or their new recruits) present misleading evidence to the court.

Will Brexit frustrate your European works council?
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 March 2019

The final form of Brexit remains uncertain, as does its impact on European works councils governed by UK law. As such, employers with European works councils currently governed by the United Kingdom's European works council legislation are strongly advised to conditionally appoint a new representative agent in a state that will remain in the European Union.

Court of Appeal upholds EAT decision on Asda equal pay claims
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 March 2019

The Court of Appeal recently upheld an Employment Appeal Tribunal decision that Asda's lower-paid, predominately female retail staff can compare themselves to higher-paid, mainly male, distribution depot staff. While the facts are specific to Asda, any employer with different groups of predominantly male or female workers should review its pay practices, regardless of whether these groups work at the same site.

Redundancy protection for pregnancy and maternity to be extended?
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 06 March 2019

The government recently published a consultation paper extending protection from redundancy for pregnant women, women who have returned to work after maternity leave and new parents. The paper seeks views on whether protection should be extended throughout pregnancy and for a period after a woman returns to work and whether this should also apply to parents who have taken other types of leave.

National 'sickie' day: tips for managing sickness absence
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 February 2019

In 2018 sickness absences cost UK employers an average of £656 per employee. With employers likely to experience the highest levels of sickness absence between January and March, those looking to tackle short-term intermittent sickness absence may want to consider (among other things) offering flexible working options and duvet days while limiting the amount of annual leave employees take in the summer.

Good Work Plan – any good?
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 13 February 2019

The government recently published details of its Good Work Plan, which sets out its considered position on the Taylor review of modern working practices. While the plan provides useful information on what is likely to happen, it is too early for employers to do much to prepare. The draft regulations that have been published so far are relatively straightforward and most changes will not come into effect until April 2020 at the earliest.

2018 in employment law
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 06 February 2019

There were a number of significant employment law decisions in 2018, particularly on the issue of employment status, which continues to be a hot topic. In addition, the fallout from various high-profile allegations of sexual harassment and the resulting #MeToo movement has continued, with the use of non-disclosure agreements in harassment cases provoking debate. There are also various reforms planned following the government's response to the Taylor review of modern working practices.

Court of Appeal rejects Uber's worker status appeal
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 30 January 2019

The Court of Appeal recently upheld the Employment Appeal Tribunal's ruling that drivers engaged by Uber are workers rather than independent contractors. The majority also upheld the employment tribunal's finding that drivers are working when they are signed into the Uber app and ready to work. Doubt arose from the fact that a driver could have other rival apps switched on at the same time, in which case it was arguable that they were not at Uber's disposal until having accepted a trip.

Trade union's Deliveroo judicial review challenge fails
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 09 January 2019

The High Court recently dismissed a judicial review challenge to a finding by the Central Arbitration Committee that Deliveroo riders are not workers. Although permission for judicial review had been granted on limited grounds, the judgment provides important guidance on what constitutes an employment relationship in the context of EU human rights law and emphatically endorses Deliveroo's position that riders are genuinely self-employed.

Court of Appeal holds employer liable for wrongful disclosure of personal data by rogue employee
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 02 January 2019

The High Court recently considered a case where an internal auditor from the supermarket chain Morrisons disclosed payroll data on the Internet relating to about 100,000 of his colleagues following an internal disciplinary process. The auditor was tracked down, charged and sentenced to eight years in prison. But was Morrisons liable to the employees whose information he had leaked?

Private sector must operate new IR35 rules for contractors from April 2020
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 December 2018

The chancellor recently confirmed that with effect from 6 April 2020, businesses in the private sector which engage 'contractors' (ie, individuals who supply their services via their own company or partnership (the intermediary)) will be responsible for determining whether the IR35 rules apply. If the business considers that IR35 applies, the person paying the intermediary will be responsible for operating pay-as-you-earn and national insurance contributions on the fees that it pays to the intermediary.

Employer NICs on termination payments delayed again
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 12 December 2018

The government's plan to make termination payments in excess of £30,000 subject to employer national insurance contributions has been delayed for a second time and will now take effect from April 2020. Initially this change was expected to be introduced from April 2018; however, the Autumn 2017 Budget announced that it would take effect from April 2019. The further delay is welcome news for employers as it will help to keep the costs of settlement payments down for another 12 months.

Court backs recruitment agency seeking to enforce non-solicitation and non-dealing clauses against former employee
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 05 December 2018

The High Court has awarded an interim injunction to Berry Recruitment Limited to prevent a former employee from soliciting and dealing with its clients and candidates. This case reinforces the fact that, in the right circumstances, recruitment businesses can enforce post-termination restrictions against employees without the trouble and expense of a full hearing.

Company held liable for managing director's violent conduct
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 November 2018

The Court of Appeal has ruled that a company was vicariously liable for the violent conduct of its managing director in physically attacking one of his employees at a Christmas party. The decision confirms that employers can be vicariously liable for actions taking place outside the normal employer-employee environment, such as an off-duty misuse of authority by someone in a senior position.

Ethnicity pay reporting: why it's not that simple
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 07 November 2018

The government says that it is "time to move to mandatory ethnicity pay reporting" and recently launched a consultation on a possible new law. The consultation seeks feedback on the sort of information that employers should be required to publish. It sets out some different ways in which this could be done, including by having a single pay gap figure of 'white versus non-white' or multiple pay gap figures for all of the different ethnicities or by publishing pay information by £20,000 pay band or by quartile.

Heathrow fined over data breach: key takeaways for employers
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 31 October 2018

The Information Commissioner's Office has made a civil monetary penalty order of £120,000 against Heathrow Airport Ltd after a lost USB stick containing the sensitive personal information of a number of employees was found by a member of the public. Employers should evaluate whether it is necessary to allow employees to use removable storage media and ensure that employees are fully informed of the applicable data protection policies and given relevant and adequate training.

Parental bereavement bill receives royal assent
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 October 2018

The Parental Bereavement (Pay and Leave) Bill recently received royal assent to become the Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Act 2018. The act entitles employed parents who have lost a child to take statutory paid leave to allow them time to grieve. The new rights are expected to come into force in 2020.

EAT finds that pre-transfer dismissal was by reason of transfer and automatically unfair
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 October 2018

The Employment Appeal Tribunal recently upheld a decision that the dismissal of an employee immediately before a Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations transfer was automatically unfair because the principal reason was the transfer. The case emphasises that even where an employer believes that it has a non-transfer-related rationale for the dismissal, caution should be exercised if the dismissal will occur close to the transfer date.

TUPE and the transfer of public administrative functions
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 03 October 2018

In a case about whether Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) (TUPE) Regulations applied to the transfer of a public health team commissioning service, the Employment Appeal Tribunal has considered points of appeal in relation to two seldom litigated provisions of TUPE: Regulations 3(5) and 4(1).

Fragmentation of activity may preclude service provision change
Lewis Silkin
  • Employment & Benefits
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 September 2018

The Employment Appeal Tribunal has confirmed that when considering whether there has been a service provision change under the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations, a tribunal must identify the relevant activity. Further, the analysis must be conducted in the right order and any fragmentation should be considered when determining whether activities carried on by the subsequent service provider are fundamentally the same as those carried on by the outgoing service provider.

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