Netherlands, AKD updates

Intellectual Property

Contributed by AKD
Injunction against foreign director for IP infringement based on Dutch law on directors' liability
  • Netherlands
  • 09 March 2020

In preliminary proceedings, The Hague District Court recently assessed whether an injunction could be granted against an Irish director of a company based in Ireland in relation to a copyright infringement in the Netherlands. This judgment is a useful reminder that company directors who are not domiciled in the Netherlands can be liable under Dutch law on directors' liability when offering infringing products in the Netherlands.

Competence of district courts in summary proceedings relating to EU community designs
  • Netherlands
  • 13 January 2020

The Supreme Court recently requested a preliminary ruling from the European Court of Justice (ECJ) concerning the competence of district courts in summary proceedings relating to EU community designs. An immediate consequence of the ECJ's decision is that district courts other than the one in The Hague will be unable to provide provisional measures in cases relating to EU trademarks.

Court rules on inventor's failure to transfer patent
  • Netherlands
  • 21 October 2019

The Hague District Court recently rendered a judgment regarding an inventor's failure to cooperate with the exploitation of his patents. The claimant had alleged that the defendant's refusal to cooperate with the transfer of the patent to a foundation (which would have subsequently granted the claimant a licence) had prevented it from exploiting the patent, including sub-licensing it to third parties.

'Spreading' a work under Dutch copyright law: the gift that should not have been given
  • Netherlands
  • 26 August 2019

Article 12 of the Copyright Act lists a number of acts that fall within the definition of 'disclosure to the public'. In addition to the more straightforward cases of disclosure, Article 12(1)(2) specifically stipulates that disclosure also includes verbreiding (translated in English as 'spreading') all or part of a work or a reproduction thereof where the work has not yet appeared in print. Although there is little case law on the act of spreading, the subject was recently debated in an Amsterdam Court of Appeal case.

Not all alterations of architectural works result in infringements of moral rights
  • Netherlands
  • 29 April 2019

The Supreme Court recently issued a long-awaited decision on an architect's moral rights of paternity and integrity. In recent years, several Dutch judgments have considered whether architects can oppose changes to their original building designs. The Supreme Court's decision further clarifies that it is difficult for architects to do so where the changes are necessary to alter a building's function.


Litigation

Contributed by AKD
Burden of proof remains with shipowner in proving terminal operator liability
  • Netherlands
  • 31 March 2020

The loading and unloading of cargo from ships is a key element in the transport chain. However, ships are sometimes damaged during these operations. This raises the question of whether – and on what grounds – a terminal operator can be successfully held liable for such damage. A recent Rotterdam District Court decision upheld the standard of liability established in Dutch case law, confirming that the burden of proof lies with the shipowner when it comes to demonstrating terminal operator liability.

Application of principle of effectiveness could lead to exclusion of national limitation rules
  • Netherlands
  • 24 March 2020

The Amsterdam Court of Appeal recently rendered a landmark judgment that the claims brought by claim vehicle CDC against Kemira Chemicals Oy were not time barred. The court's judgment provides additional legal certainty in the field of private antitrust enforcement. If upheld before the Supreme Court, this ruling will set a new standard wherein (Dutch) courts will be able to extend or even set aside applicable limitation rules from national regimes in follow-on proceedings.

Injunction against 'foreign' director for IP infringement based on Dutch law on liability of directors
  • Netherlands
  • 10 March 2020

In preliminary proceedings, The Hague District Court recently assessed whether an injunction could be granted against an Irish director of a company based in Ireland in relation to a copyright infringement in the Netherlands. This judgment is a useful reminder that company directors who are not domiciled in the Netherlands can be liable under Dutch law on directors' liability when offering infringing products in the Netherlands.

Competence of district courts in summary proceedings relating to EU Community designs
  • Netherlands
  • 18 February 2020

The Supreme Court recently requested a preliminary ruling from the European Court of Justice (ECJ) concerning the competence of district courts in summary proceedings relating to EU Community designs. An immediate consequence of the ECJ's decision is that district courts other than the one in The Hague will be unable to provide provisional measures in cases relating to EU trademarks.

New class actions act promotes efficient and effective settlement of large-scale damages cases
  • Netherlands
  • 28 January 2020

The Netherlands has always been at the forefront of the European Union in enabling collective redress for affected parties in mass damages cases. Since 1994, claims organisations have been able to pursue legal action on behalf of affected parties. However, the Civil Code prohibited claims organisations from pursuing damages claims. This practice has now changed significantly following the entry into force of the Act on the Resolution of Mass Claims in Collective Action.


Shipping & Transport

Contributed by AKD
Burden of proof remains with shipowner in proving terminal operator liability
  • Netherlands
  • 25 March 2020

The loading and unloading of cargo from ships is a key element in the transport chain. However, ships are sometimes damaged during these operations. This raises the question of whether – and on what grounds – a terminal operator can be successfully held liable for such damage. A recent Rotterdam District Court decision upheld the standard of liability established in Dutch case law, confirming that the burden of proof lies with the shipowner when it comes to demonstrating terminal operator liability.

The Netherlands – a hotspot for provisional and conservatory measures
  • Netherlands
  • 04 December 2019

Ports in the Amsterdam, Rotterdam and Antwerp region are historically known as ship arrest paradises. However, there are developments in connection with conservatory measures which are less well known and that have not been extensively reported on. These developments concern securing evidence following a landmark Supreme Court ruling in 2013, which has served as a starting point for several cases.

Flying the Dutch flag: opportunities for shipowners
  • Netherlands
  • 23 October 2019

Flying the Dutch flag has unfortunately become less popular with shipowners over the past 10 years. Although the exact reasons for this fall in popularity are unknown, the presumption that flying the Dutch flag is limited by the location of the vessel's owner may be a contributing factor. However, although on the face of it only European shipowners appear to be able to obtain a nationality certificate, the scope for flying the Dutch flag is actually much wider.

Court removes need for bailiffs to board ships to execute arrests
  • Netherlands
  • 25 September 2019

The Netherlands has long been considered one of the most favourable jurisdictions in which to arrest a ship. A recent Aruba Court ruling is set to enhance this reputation by further liberalising the procedural rules, removing the need for a bailiff to board a ship in order to execute an arrest. The decision is expected to play a role in ship arrest cases throughout the Kingdom of the Netherlands where bad weather conditions, or even deliberate obstruction, may prevent bailiffs from boarding ships.

Understanding legal position of digital logistics platforms
  • Netherlands
  • 22 May 2019

Digital platforms which connect logistics service providers with their customers have become commonplace. A relevant question from a legal perspective is whether such a platform acts as a carrier or freight forwarder. The answer to this question will affect a platform's civil and public law exposure. As such, platforms should consider their legal position carefully.


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