Latest updates

Price of litigating in Brazil: court-awarded attorneys' fees
TozziniFreire Advogados
  • Litigation
  • Brazil
  • 23 April 2019

In addition to contractual fees, winning attorneys are entitled to court-awarded attorneys' fees, which are determined using objective criteria. However, despite being relatively straightforward to calculate, some courts struggle to award attorneys' fees, particularly in disputes involving significant amounts. A recent Superior Court of Justice decision provides clarity in this regard and is likely to set the tone for future disputes regarding court-awarded attorneys' fees.

Defender v HSBC: impact of settling with one concurrent wrongdoer
Matheson
  • Litigation
  • Ireland
  • 23 April 2019

Defender v HSBC highlights the need for plaintiffs to understand the blameworthiness of all wrongdoers before settling a claim against any of them. This case concerned Defender, a fund which invested with Bernard Madoff and subsequently suffered a loss when Madoff was revealed to be operating the world's largest Ponzi scheme.

Time may not be of the essence when considering specific performance
Dentons
  • Litigation
  • Canada
  • 23 April 2019

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently outlined when specific performance will be available in a real estate transaction. This decision is a stark reminder of the pitfalls of acting both in bad faith and without diligence in respect of such a transaction. It is also a reminder that a party to an agreement of purchase and sale cannot insist that time is of the essence if (among other things) it breaches the agreement and does not act in good faith.

Legislature introduces possibility to claim mass damages in collective action proceedings
AKD The Netherlands
  • Litigation
  • Netherlands
  • 23 April 2019

The Senate recently adopted the Bill on Redress of Mass Damages in Collective Actions (RMDCA). The RMDCA enables representative entities to claim monetary compensation on behalf of their constituents, which provides aggrieved parties with more effective means of redress. The RMDCA also introduces stricter requirements regarding the admissibility of representative entities and the scope of collective action proceedings, along with other procedural changes.

Courts confirm basis for indemnity costs
RPC
  • Litigation
  • Hong Kong
  • 23 April 2019

A couple of recent first-instance decisions demonstrate the courts' wide discretion to award costs between parties based on a higher rate of recovery (referred to as an 'indemnity basis'). Such costs are not literally an indemnity – the receiving party does not recover all of their costs from the paying party. While indemnity costs are not the norm, many parties and their legal representatives often seek such costs without sufficient regard to whether this is actually justified.

Periodic payment orders in catastrophic injury cases
Matheson
  • Insurance
  • Ireland
  • 23 April 2019

A recently signed ministerial order marks the formal introduction of long-awaited periodic payment orders (PPOs) in Ireland. This should be a welcome development for insurers as it will avoid upfront compensation payments in catastrophic injury cases. It will also align the Irish regime of awards in case of catastrophic injury with the UK system, under which PPOs are already available.

SEC announces settlements resulting from Share Class Selection Disclosure Initiative
Morrison & Foerster LLP
  • Capital Markets
  • USA
  • 23 April 2019

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) recently announced settlements with 79 investment advisers who self-reported violations of the Investment Advisers Act in connection with the SEC Division of Enforcement Share Class Selection Disclosure Initiative. The advisers collectively agreed to return more than $125 million in fees and prejudgment interest to clients.

Duty of care can exist between parent company and third parties affected by subsidiaries' actions
RPC
  • Litigation
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 April 2019

A recent Supreme Court decision concerned a mass tort claim and the potential liability of an English parent company for the actions of its foreign subsidiaries. The court found that a duty of care can exist between a parent company and third parties affected by the actions of its subsidiaries, but was reluctant to place limits on the types of case where a parent company might incur a duty of care.

Federal Court finds invalidity allegations relating to patent for metformin formulations unjustified
Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh
  • Intellectual Property
  • Canada
  • 22 April 2019

Valeant Canada's application for an order prohibiting the minister of health from issuing a notice of compliance to Generic Partners for its generic version of Valeant's Glumetza, a metformin formulation, was recently granted. With respect to anticipation and double patenting, the court found that the prior art document on which Generic Partners had relied for both allegations did not disclose all three of the size, shape and time elements of the claimed formulations.

Technology's role in commercial contracts
  • Company & Commercial
  • Brazil
  • 22 April 2019

Simple legal transactions and contracts can often be completed at the click of a button. However, there are a growing number of investment rounds in start-ups based on Brazilian versions of Silicon Valley contracts that unfortunately have not benefited from the critical eye and practical expertise of experienced lawyers who can examine the contracts under Brazilian law.

Royalties, currency conversion and taxes: what rights holders need to know
KISCH IP
  • Intellectual Property
  • South Africa
  • 22 April 2019

South Africa has significant exchange control regulations in place that restrict and require approval for payments in international IP licensing relationships. Typically, if an IP right in issue has been commercialised or if its commercialisation is imminent, exchange control requires an appropriately motivated valuation substantiating the price to be furnished.

Biosimilars and the BPCIA: past, present and future
Venable LLP
  • Intellectual Property
  • USA
  • 22 April 2019

While the biosimilar market in the United States has gotten off to a relatively slow start compared with Europe – where biosimilars have been available since 2006 – it has recently gained momentum and will continue to grow in the coming years as more blockbuster biologics lose regulatory exclusivity and patent protection.

Battle of the bottles: EU Trademark Court of Appeal finds infringement of well-known Malibu bottle
  • Intellectual Property
  • European Union
  • 22 April 2019

In December 2018 the EU Trademark Court of Appeal declared that the Ibiza Beach drink marketed by Productos Ibicencos, SL and Aromáticas de Ibiza, SL – whose bottle was highly similar to the well-known Malibu bottle – infringed The Absolut Company AB's (TAC's) 3D and graphic trademarks which protect the shape of such bottle. Among other things, the court held that the defendants had taken unfair advantage of TAC's trademarks, as their product was very similar in appearance.

Flashlight decision illuminates compensation guidelines for unlawful use of IP rights
Graf & Pitkowitz Rechtsanwalte GmbH
  • Intellectual Property
  • Austria
  • 22 April 2019

The Supreme Court recently had to decide whether the infringer of a registered Community design had to hand over the entire net profit or just a share of profit earned due to its use of an infringed design. The decision has great practical importance, as it gives IP rights holders clear guidelines regarding what to expect when claiming compensation for an unlawful use of their rights.

Directors duty to act in company's best interests: how much is too much?
Bodipalar Ponnudurai De Silva
  • Company & Commercial
  • Malaysia
  • 22 April 2019

A recent case suggests that there are limits to the way in which directors can act when taking steps to protect a company. The case is a useful reminder that while directors may avail themselves of the shield provided by the judicial management regime in order to allow a company time to regain its footing, the courts will not hesitate to put checks and balances in place to prevent the misuse of such legislation, albeit for the purpose of safeguarding a company's survival.

Counterfeiting through small shipments – new border measures expected
Deris Attorney At Law Partnership
  • Intellectual Property
  • Turkey
  • 22 April 2019

The absence of a clear reference to small shipments in customs legislation has created doubt over whether customs officers should seize small shipments of counterfeit goods. This unfortunately encourages manufacturers of counterfeit goods to minimise the risk of seizure by using small shipments. However, the government looks set to enact a new Customs Law to regulate small shipments and protect rights holders.

Help is here for audit committees – CAQ offers updated auditor assessment tool
Cooley LLP
  • Company & Commercial
  • USA
  • 22 April 2019

To fulfil their oversight responsibilities, audit committees typically evaluate external auditors at least annually to determine, in part, whether they should be engaged for the subsequent fiscal year. The Centre for Audit Quality (CAQ) recently published an updated External Auditor Assessment Tool. Like many other helpful CAQ tools, this one provides a number of sample questions to help audit committees satisfy their oversight obligations with regard to external auditors.

Andreas Stihl registers orange and grey colour combination as trademark
Wanhuida Peksung IP Group
  • Intellectual Property
  • China
  • 22 April 2019

Colour combinations have been registrable as marks since the Trademark Law was amended in 2001. However, in practice, this has been difficult, as examiners often opt for the easy solution of refusing such marks on account of their lack of distinctiveness. The Beijing IP Court case involving Andreas Stihl AG & Co KG's orange and grey abstract colour combination trademark illustrates the difficulties in this regard and showcases how to register a colour combination trademark in China.

Border update: importers should expect slowdowns and delays
Arent Fox LLP
  • International Trade
  • USA
  • 19 April 2019

While various news accounts have now indicated that President Trump will not close the US-Mexico border, the administration will take further actions. As such, there will likely be a slowdown in border processing and longer wait times at all land ports of entry on the Mexican border for an extended period. Among other things, importers are advised to factor in that wait times will markedly increase or even double.

Taxation of virtual currencies
Porobija & Porobija
  • Banking
  • Croatia
  • 19 April 2019

The Croatian Tax Authority has issued several relevant opinions regarding the taxation of virtual currencies. Since 2015 the Croatian Tax Authority, in line with the European Court of Justice's Skatteverket decision, has exempted virtual currency exchange services from value added tax, established relevant tax treatments for the mining and trading of virtual currencies and provided its opinion on payments in virtual currencies.

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