Ms Louise Turner

Louise Turner

Updates

Litigation

Media victory in Rio Ferdinand privacy case
United Kingdom | 11 October 2011

Footballer Rio Ferdinand has lost his privacy battle against the Sunday Mirror over an article published about him in 2010. The bottom line in the decision was that the public interest in publishing the article outweighed his reasonable expectation of privacy. The threat of appeal has enabled Ferdinand to request that parts of the public judgment be removed. However, for now, the media can revel in a rare 'kiss and tell' privacy win.

Unified justice: the proposed new Courts and Tribunals Service
United Kingdom | 11 January 2011

The Ministry of Justice has announced that from April 1 2011 Her Majesty's Court Service and the Tribunals Service will be merged to form a new, single organisation: Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service. Although it has outlined many benefits of the new system, the ministry intends to ensure that certain important and unique aspects of the separate services are not affected.

Contractual interpretation – excluding and capping liability
United Kingdom | 27 July 2010

In a recent case the High Court once more addressed the distinction between direct, indirect and consequential losses, and interpreted exclusion clauses narrowly. More unusually, the court also considered a limitation of liability cap in a contract and held that it applied to contractual but not statutory interest.

Tech, Data, Telecoms & Media

Media victory in Rio Ferdinand privacy case
United Kingdom | 27 October 2011

Footballer Rio Ferdinand has lost his privacy battle against the Sunday Mirror over an article published about him in 2010. The bottom line in the decision was that the public interest in publishing the article outweighed his reasonable expectation of privacy. The threat of appeal has enabled Ferdinand to request that parts of the public judgment be removed. However, for now, the media can revel in a rare 'kiss and tell' privacy win.

Reporting the courts: postponement orders and alternative solutions
United Kingdom | 28 July 2011

The right to report on what takes place in the courts is vital to the media's role as the public's watchdog. However, the law in this area is becoming increasingly complex. It is essential for journalists and media organisations to understand the scope of the possible restrictions, and for the judiciary to remain within the recognised and intended scope when making orders that restrict the freedom of the press.