Mr Keith Mathieson

Keith Mathieson

Updates

Litigation

Injunctions, affairs and the interests of children
United Kingdom | 17 May 2011

A Court of Appeal judgment on reporting and privacy has prompted gasps of horror from some sections of the media. More surprisingly, the public - often suspicious of press self-interest in these matters - may think that the newspapers are right and that the courts have gone too far.

Tech, Data, Telecoms & Media

Court of Appeal rejects "tenuous claim to privacy"
United Kingdom | 04 August 2011

Can anyone expect to keep a second family private? In dismissing an appeal brought after a rejected application for an injunction against The Sun newspaper, the Court of Appeal has presented a significant analysis of the legal framework of privacy protection, in a case involving "a strong claim to freedom of expression in the public interest" against "at best, a tenuous claim to privacy".

High Court judgments: privacy and injunctions in the internet age
United Kingdom | 16 June 2011

In recent weeks the High Court has considered a number of cases involving conflicting rights to freedom of expression and to family and private life. In particular, the judgment in CTB v News Group (No 2) can be seen as providing a judicial answer to questions about the future of privacy injunctions in the days of social networking and the Internet.

Injunctions, affairs and the interests of children
United Kingdom | 05 May 2011

A Court of Appeal judgment on reporting and privacy has prompted gasps of horror from some sections of the media. More surprisingly, the public - often suspicious of press self-interest in these matters - may think that the newspapers are right and that the courts have gone too far.

When can super-injunctions be granted?
United Kingdom | 20 January 2011

Super-injunctions are injunctions that prevent publication of the fact that the court has made an injunction. Recent case law have made clear that they will be granted only in rare cases where publication of the order would frustrate its very purpose or where there is some other unusual and compelling reason.