Mr Hiroshi Suga

Hiroshi Suga

Lawyer biography

Admitted

  • Japan (1993)

Specializations

  • General Corporate , M&A , Start-up Businesses , Labor Law , Civil & Commercial Disputes , IP Disputes , Antitrust , IP Licenses

Education

  • 1991 The University of Tokyo (LL.B.)
  • 1998 The University of Chicago Law School (LL.M.)

Professional experience

  • 2007- Deputy Chariman of Committee of Training Center of Daini Tokyo Bar Association

Publications

  • Aug 2006 Handling of Trade Secrets and License Agreements in Restructing Group Companies October edition of Japan Business Law, 2006
  • Sep 2004 Reform of Corporation Law and Its Impact on M&A Practice September edition of M&A Review

Updates

Intellectual Property

Fintech patent infringement litigation between venture businesses
Japan | 13 November 2017

The Tokyo District Court recently rendered its judgment in a patent infringement case regarding fintech-related technologies. This case has been widely reported on in Japan because both parties are major venture businesses and leaders in the Japanese fintech market. This case is also notable as the defendant's cloud-based accounting system involved machine-learning technologies and disputes of this nature are expected to increase.

Introduction of Non-exclusive Patent Licence Registration System
Japan | 20 August 2007

The Law on Special Measures for Industrial Revitalization is to be further amended by Law 36/2007. Among other things, the amendment introduces a non-exclusive patent licence registration system. Where a licensing agreement complying with certain requirements is registered in the Specified Non-exclusive Licences Register, the licences covered by the agreement will be effective against third parties.

IP High Court Invalidates Matsushita Patent
Japan | 12 December 2005

The IP High Court has overturned a first instance decision by the Tokyo District Court, which had ruled that software programs sold by Justsystem infringed a Matsushita patent for the help function of a software program. This was the first case heard by the Grand Panel of the court. The panel found that the Matsushita patent was invalid as obvious and thus could not be enforced against Justsystem.