Mr Enare Erim

Enare Erim

Updates

Litigation

Status of progressive storage charges
Nigeria | 27 March 2018

In a recent Court of Appeal case, the appellant terminal operators challenged the Nigerian Shippers' Council's powers to review local storage charges unilaterally. The judgment gives further judicial impetus to the government's policy intent, particularly with regard to storage operations at the nation's ports. However, it conflicts with an earlier decision by the same court concerning the Nigerian Shippers' Council's role as the economic regulator of the Nigerian ports.

Waterways: Lagos v federal government – who won?
Nigeria | 17 October 2017

The Court of Appeal recently declared the Lagos State House of Assembly competent to make laws relating to intra-inland waterways in the state. The appeal turned on whether the regulation and control of Lagos state intrastate and inland waterways fall under the exclusive legislative list which confers legislative competence on the National Assembly. Contrary to reports, the decision is hardly a win for the Lagos state government.

Shipping & Transport

Limiting shipowners' liability for compulsory pilotage services
Nigeria | 06 March 2019

It is not uncommon for shipowners to incur liability for acts or omissions for which neither they nor their employees are directly responsible. This is particularly common in the compulsory pilotage field. However, even in cases where liability cannot be disputed, shipowners may be entitled to limit their liability or, in some cases, escape it entirely.

Supreme Court overrules previous case law on service outside jurisdiction
Nigeria | 10 October 2018

In a watershed decision, the Supreme Court appears to have overruled itself on the question of what constitutes 'outside jurisdiction' in relation to the Admiralty Court (Federal High Court) for the purpose of determining whether leave of court is required to effect service of an originating process. The decision puts to bed the decade-long unease surrounding the territorial jurisdiction of the Admiralty Court in the wake of MV Arabella.

Claims for unpaid crew wages unenforceable in Federal High Court
Nigeria | 01 August 2018

Maritime claims are generally under the Federal High Court's exclusive jurisdiction and enforceable by an admiralty action in rem or in personam. However, in a decision which portends significant implications for Nigeria's maritime jurisprudence, the court recently held that a claim for crew wages fell outside its jurisdiction.

Proper service of processes in admiralty action in rem
Nigeria | 02 May 2018

Various questions can arise regarding the service of processes in admiralty proceedings. For example, what happens if a ship (X) is named as the first defendant in a writ of summons, along with a second defendant which is merely referred to as the "owner of X"? Does the action cease to be one in rem? Further, where X is a foreign ship, is leave of court required to effect service on the second defendant? Although a recent Court of Appeal decision is instructive in this regard, it was arguably reached per incuriam.

Don't let your maritime claim expire
Nigeria | 25 April 2018

Maritime claims arise in relation to the ownership, possession, mortgage and general operation of a ship and are primarily enforced by an admiralty action in rem or in personam. Admiralty actions do not last forever; rather, they have prescribed limitation periods, which often vary depending on the type of claim. Thus, if a claim is not brought within the time prescribed by the relevant law or contract, a party with an otherwise valid claim will generally lose its right of action on that claim.

Status of progressive storage charges
Nigeria | 21 March 2018

In a recent Court of Appeal case, the appellant terminal operators challenged the Nigerian Shippers' Council's powers to review local storage charges unilaterally. The judgment gives further judicial impetus to the government's policy intent, particularly with regard to storage operations at the nation's ports. However, it conflicts with an earlier decision by the same court concerning the Nigerian Shippers' Council's role as the economic regulator of the Nigerian ports.

Waterways: Lagos v federal government – who won?
Nigeria | 11 October 2017

The Court of Appeal recently declared the Lagos State House of Assembly competent to make laws relating to intra-inland waterways in the state. The appeal turned on whether the regulation and control of Lagos state intrastate and inland waterways falls under the exclusive legislative list which confers legislative competence on the National Assembly. Contrary to reports, the decision is hardly a win for the Lagos state government.

Avoiding vessel detention in Nigeria
Nigeria | 19 April 2017

Certain government agencies in Nigeria are empowered to detain vessels operating within the country's territorial waters. Detention is mostly used to enforce regulatory compliance and secure the payment of statutory dues at the nation's various ports. In order to avoid vessel detention in Nigeria, it is necessary to identify the circumstances in which such a detention can arise.

Bunkering operation guidelines
Nigeria | 01 June 2016

The Department of Petroleum Resources' bunkering guidelines apply to all vessels engaged in bunker fuel business or trade within any part of Nigeria's territorial or internal waters. They regulate all matters pertaining to bunkering, including the issuance of licences. Any party intending to participate in bunkering operations must obtain a bunkering licence. Failure to do so can incur a penalty of $1 million and criminal prosecution.

Which cargo liability regime applies to your carriage by sea contract?
Nigeria | 06 April 2016

Due to their relatively conflicting provisions, the continued co-existence of the Hague Rules and the Hamburg Rules has generated confusion among ship and cargo owners. Although the Hamburg Rules adequately and equitably regulate carriage of goods by sea transactions in Nigeria, steps should be taken to formally denounce the Hague Rules to clarify the subject for those who may still be confused.

Bareboat vessel registration: an overview
Nigeria | 10 February 2016

A ship intended for use in the Nigerian cabotage trade must be registered as a bareboat vessel. The Coastal and Inland Shipping Cabotage (Bareboat Registration) Regulations set out guidelines and criteria for the registration of bareboat vessels, including the eligibility requirements, the obligations of a registered vessel, the application of private law provisions and the grounds for refusal or termination.